Assiniboine Bands

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At one time, more than fourty Assiniboine bands roamed North America. Modern scholars say they split from the main Sioux tribes in the early 1700s, but the Assiniboine people say they have always been a separate tribe.

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Enrollment requirements for the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of Fort Peck

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A person must meet one of the following requirements to be enrolled in the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of Fort Peck:

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Enrollment requirements for the Aroostook Band of Micmacs

In order to become a member of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, you must be able to prove pre-recognition ties to Aroostook County, Maine before November 26, 1991, and provide documentation to prove your Aroostook ancestry. Other requirements include:

  • You must have the certification within the application notarized.
  • Provide a Certified Birth Certificate, which will be returned to you after copies are made for your file.
  • You must be a United States citizen. Continue reading

Names of Apache Tribes

Many of the historical names of Apache groups that were recorded by non-Apache are difficult to match to modern-day tribes or their subgroups. Over the centuries, many Spanish, French and/or English-speaking authors did not differentiate between Apache and other seminomadic non-Apache peoples who might pass through the same area. Most commonly, Europeans learned to identify the tribes by translating their exonym, what another group whom the Europeans encountered first called the Apachean peoples. Europeans often did not learn what the peoples called themselves, referred to as their autonyms.

While anthropologists agree on some traditional major subgrouping of Apaches, they have often used different criteria to name finer divisions, and these do not always match modern Apache groupings. Some scholars do not consider groups residing in what is now Mexico to be Apache. In addition, an Apache individual has different ways of identification with a group, such as a band or clan, as well as the larger tribe or language grouping, which can add to the difficulties in an outsider comprehending the distinctions.

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Star Clan of Muscogee Creeks

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Brief summary.

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Machis Lower Creek Indian Tribe

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Who are the Machis Lower Creek Indian Tribe ?

Brief summary.

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Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe (East of the Mississippi)

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Brief Summary.

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Muscogee Creek Nation

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Who are the Muscogee Creek Nation?

Early ancestors of The Muscogee Creek Nation constructed magnificent earthen pyramids along the rivers of what is now the Southeastern United States as part of their elaborate ceremonial complexes. The Muscogee later built expansive towns within these same broad river valleys in the present states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida and South Carolina.

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Cahuilla creation story

The Cahuilla Creation Story   The world began, we are told through our songs, with the creation of twin brothers, Mukat and Temayawet. Through the power of the Creator, the brothers made tobacco, the sacred pipe, the six directions, and … Continue reading

Cahuilla creation story

The Cahuilla Creation Story The world began, we are told through our songs, with the creation of twin brothers, Mukat and Temayawet. In the creation, Mukat and Temayuwat were born from the union of twin balls of lightning, which were … Continue reading

Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Timeline

According to oral traditions, the Ojibwe first lived on the Atlantic coast of North America. About 500 years ago, the ancestors of the Mille Lacs Band began migrating west. By the mid-1700s, the Ojibwe had established themselves in the region around Mille Lacs Lake in what is today East Central Minnesota. Read on for a timeline of important events in the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Indians.

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Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation

Agua Caliente Reservation in California

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Who are the Agua Caliente Indians?

The Agua Caliente  Band of Cahuilla Indians is one of nine bands of Cahuilla Indians living in southern California. They are a federally recognized indian tribe.  The Cahuilla tribe of Native Americans have inhabited California for more than 2,000 years.

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Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation

O 'Odham (Pima) brush wickiup

Who is the Ak Chin Indian Community?

The Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation is a Native American community located in the Santa Cruz Valley in Arizona. The community is composed mainly of Akimel O’odham (Pima), and Tohono O’odham (Papago), as well as some Hia-Ced O’odham members.

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Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas

Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas entrance sign

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Who are the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe?

The Alabama and Coushatta formed an inter-tribal friendship shortly after each tribe migrated into Texas. In the early 1800s, their original homelands were taken over by white settlers. Sam Houston recommended that the state purchase 1,280 acres for the Alabamas and set aside 640 acres for the Coushattas. The land for the Coushattas never materialized, so either through marriage or special permission, the Coushatta came to live on the allotted lands of the Alabamas – uniting the two to become the Alabama-Coushatta.

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Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town

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Who is the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town?

Prior to the removal of the Muscogee Confederacy from their Southeastern homelands in the 1820’s and 30’s, the Alabama and Quassarte people each had a distinct identity as aTribal Town(or Tribe) of the Confederacy.  The Confederacy consisted of more than 44  of these “Towns” scattered throughout the Southeastern woodlands. 

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Alturas Indian Rancheria

Pit River Valley

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Who are the Alturas Indians?

The Alturas Indian Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Achumawi Indians in California. The Achumawi are also known as Pit River Indians.

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Apache Tribe of Oklahoma

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Who is the Apache Tribe?

Also known as the Plains Apache, there are many Apache tribes. The Apache Tribe of Oklahoma consider themselves as having always been a distinct linguistic and cultural group. They are descendants of Athabascan-speaking Apache groups who have inhabited the Plains since the 15th century and are members of the Eastern Apache branch which includes the Lipan, Jicarilla and Mescalero Apache tribes.

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Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

Wind River Reservation

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Who are the Arapaho Tribe?

The Northern Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation is one of four groups of Arapaho who originally occupied the headwaters of the Arkansas and Platte Rivers in what is now northeastern Colorado. Culturally, a Plains Indian tribe, the Arapaho are distinguished from other Plains tribes by their language, which is a variation of the Algonquin language. 

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Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians of Maine

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Who are the Aroostook Band of Micmacs?

The Aroostook Band of Micmacs  and 28 other bands that are based in Canada comprise the Micmac  Nation.  The Micmacs are members of the  Wabanaki Confederacy, an alliance that was forged among the Maliseet, Passamaquoddy,  Penobscot, and Abenaki tribes in the 18th century.

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Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation

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Who are the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes ?

The Fort Peck Reservation is home to two separate American Indian nations, each including numerous bands and divisions. The Sioux divisions of Sisseton, Wahpetons, Yanktonais, and the Teton Hunkpapa are all represented. The Assiniboine bands of Canoe Paddler and Red Bottom are also included in this tribe. Scholars believe that the Assiniboine broke away from Yanktonai Dakota (Sioux) in the 16th century.

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Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians

Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Executive Offices

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Who are the Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians?

The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians are the smallest tribal nation in the United States, consisting today of six family members who are all related to Tribal Chairperson Mary Ann Green, who is the owner the Augustine Casino. The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians is a band of Native Americans based in Coachella, California. The namesake for the Augustine Tribe and Reservation was Captain Vee-Vee Augustine who was born in the year 1820.

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Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation

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Who are the Bad River Band of Ojibwe Indians?

The Bad River Band is one of six Ojibwe bands in Wisconsin that are federally recognized tribes.  The Chippewa or Ojibwe Nation is one of the three largest native nations in North America.

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Bay Mills Indian Community

Who are the Bay Mills Indian Community?

The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC), is an Indian reservation forming the land base of one of the many Sault Ste. Marie bands of Chippewa Indians. (Not to be confused with the “Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians” located in Sault Ste. Marie, MI). It is also the tribal name of this federally recognized Indian tribe.

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Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria

Who are the Bear River tribe?

The Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria are the people of the Eel River Basin. They are located in Northern California on the Pacific coast in Loleta, California. Members are mostly Wiyot and Mattole.

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Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California

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Who are the Tyme Maidu Tribe of the Berry Creek Rancheria?

Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California is a federally recognized Maidu tribe in Southern California.

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Big Lagoon Rancheria

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Who are the Big Lagoon Indian Tribe?

The Big Lagoon Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Yurok and Tolowa Indians. 

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Big Pine Paiute Tribe of Owens Valley

 Who is the Big Pine Paiute Tribe?

Big Pine Paiute Tribe is federally recognized tribe of of Mono Paiute and Timbisha Shoshone Indians who live on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in Big Pine, California.

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Big Sandy Rancheria of Western Mono Indians of California

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In 1909, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) purchased 280 acres of land to be held in trust for the benefit of the San Joaquin or Big Sandy Band of Western Mono Indians. This land became known as the Big Sandy Rancheria of Auberry.

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Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians of the Big Valley Rancheria

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Who are the Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians?

The Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians of the Big Valley Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Pomo and Pit River Indians. 

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Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Montana

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The Blackfeet and Blackfoot tribes are really the same tribe. There are three divisions of the Blackfoot Nation. When the US – Canadian border was drawn, those on the Canadian side of the boundary continued to be called by their traditional branch names.

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Bridgeport Indian Colony

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The Bridgeport Indian Colony became a federally recognized indian tribe on October 17, 1974. This tribe is located just outside of Bridgeport, California in the Eastern Sierra Mountain range.  The Bridgeport Indian Colony consists of descendants from the Miwok, Mono, Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes.

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Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California

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The Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Miwok people. The Sierra Miwok are indigenous to the state of California. 

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Burns Paiute Tribe

The Burns Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized tribe located north of Burns, Oregon in Harney County. The current tribal members are primarily the descendants of the “Wadatika” band of Northern Paiute Indians that roamed in central and southern Oregon.

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Cabazon Band of Mission Indians

The members of the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians of today are descendants of Chief Cabazon who was a  leader of the desert Cahuilla Tribe from the 1830’s to the 1870’s and have called the valley home for more that 2,500 years.

The Cabazon Band of Indians were never conquered by the Spanish missionaries, although the European-American settlers still called them “Mission Indians.”

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Cachil DeHe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community of the Colusa Rancheria

The Cachil DeHe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community of the Colusa Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Wintun Indians from central California. The tribe’s reservation is the Colusa Rancheria, also known as the Cachildehe Rancheria. It is located in Colusa County, California and was founded in 1907.

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Cahuilla Band of Mission Indians of the Cahuilla Reservation

The Cahuilla Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Cahuilla Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Cahuilla Indians located in California. 

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Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria

The Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria are a federally recognized tribe who live on Cahto Rancheria in the Pacific Coast Mountain range. Cahto Rancheria is located in the center of Long Valley, and about halfway between Eureka, California, and Santa Rosa, California. It is about two miles from Laytonville, California and 26 miles from the Pacific Ocean.

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California Valley Miwok Tribe

Miwok wigwam

The California Valley Miwok Tribe is a federally recognized tribe of Miwok people in San Joaquin County and Calaveras County, California. The California Valley Miwok are Sierra Miwok, an indigenous people of California.

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Campo Kumeyaay Nation

The Campo Kumeyaay Nation is a federally recognized tribe in California. They were formerly known as the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation. The Kumeyaay Nation once ecompassed the lands from northern San Diego county to the dunes of the Imperial Valley and south beyond Ensenada, Mexico.

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Capitan Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California

Capitan Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California is a federally recognized indian tribe located in San Diego County, California. This tribe has two bands: Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation (Barona Band of Mission Indians), and Viejas (Baron Long)  Group of Capitan Grande Band of Misiion Indians of the Viejas Reservation (Viejas Band of Kumeyaay).

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Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservation

The Viejas Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservations are one of the three reservations that make up the Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians. They, along with twelve other bands collectively make up the Kumeyaay Nation of California.

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Catawba Indian Nation

The Catawba Nation is the only federally recognized tribe in the state of South Carolina. 

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Cayuga Nation of New York

In the 12th century, the Cayuga Nation, along with the Seneca, Onondaga, Oneida and Mohawk Nations united under the Great Law of Peace to form the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse) Confederacy in order to end inter-tribal fighting and bring a sustainable peace to the land.

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Cedarville Rancheria

The Cedarville Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute people in Modoc County, California. 

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Chemehuevi Indian Tribe of the Chemehuevi Reservation

The Chemehuevi Indian Tribe of the Chemehuevi Reservation is a federally recognized indian tribe, who are the southernmost branch of the Southern Paiute people.  

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Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria

The Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe made up of of Chetco, Hupa, Karuk, Tolowa, Wiyot, and Yurok people in Humboldt County, California. 

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Cherokee Nation

The Cherokee Nation is descended from those Cherokees who were removed to the Indian Territory in what is now Oklahoma on the long journey now referred to as the Trail of Tears. 

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Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes

The Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes have a long history as allies and friends. Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes have endured many hardships and changes throughout history from the Black Hills of South Dakota to the plains of Colorado and finally the open fields of Oklahoma. 

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Chickasaw Nation

The Chickasaw Nation is a federally recognized Native American nation, located in Oklahoma. They are one of the members of the Five Civilized Tribes. The Chickasaw Nation was created after the Chickasaw people were forcibly removed by the US federal government to Indian Territory in the 1830s.

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Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California

The Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Miwok people in Tuolumne County, California. The Chicken Ranch Rancheria Miwok are Central Sierra Miwok, an indigenous people of California.

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Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation

The Rocky Boy’s Reservation lies in north-central Montana near the Bear Paw Mountains. The smallest of all the Montana reservations, it is home for about half of the 4,714 enrolled members of the Chippewa-Cree Tribe.

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Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana

The Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana is a federally recognized Tribe that once occupied about one-third of what is now Louisiana, and were some of the original inhabitants of the Atchafalaya Basin, Mississippi River Delta and the Gulf Coast. 

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Mount Tabor Indian Community

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The Mount Tabor Indian Community is made up of the lineal descendants of the six remaining families of Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Muscogee-Creek Indians, who have continued to reside in rural Rusk, Smith (and after 1873 Gregg) counties of east Texas from historical times to present day.

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Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma was native to the Southeastern United States and members of the Muskogean linguistic family, which traces its roots to a mound-building, maize-based society that flourished in the Mississippi River Valley for more than a thousand years before European contact.  

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Citizen Potawatomi Nation

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation is a federally recognized tribe of Algonquian-speaking people who originally occupied the Great Lakes region of the United States.  The Potawatomi were part of the Three Fires Council made up of the Potawatomi, Ojibwe, and Odawa, collectively known as Anishnabek peoples.

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Cloverdale Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California

The Cloverdale Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Pomo Indians who are indigenous to Sonoma County in northern California.  

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Cocopah Tribe of Arizona

The Cocopah Tribe of Arizona, also known as the River People, have long lived along the lower Colorado River and delta. The Cocopah Indian Tribe is one of seven descendant Tribes from the greater Yuman language-speaking people who occupied lands along the Colorado River. Cocopah Tribal ancestors also lived along the Lower Colorado River region near the river delta and the Gulf of California.

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Coeur D’Alene Tribe

The Coeur D’Alene Tribe is a Salish speaking people located in Northern Idaho. They call themselves Schitsu’umsh, meaning “Those who were found here” or “The discovered people.”

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Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians of California

The Cold Springs tribe is composed of Western Mono Indians, whose traditional homeland is in the southern Sierra Nevada foothills of California. Cold Springs Rancheria is the name of the tribe’s reservation, which is located in Fresno County, California. 

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Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation

The Colorado River Indian Tribes are federally recognized, and  include four distinct Tribes – the Mohave, Chemehuevi, Hopi and Navajo.  The four tribes continue to maintain and observe their traditional ways and religious and culturally unique identities.

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Comanche Nation

The Comanche people are federally recognized as the Comanche Nation, headquartered in Lawton, Oklahoma. They were once part of the Shoshone peoples.

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Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes are a federally recognized tribe which includes the Bitterroot Salish, the Pend d’Oreille and the Kootenai tribes. Their aboriginal territory exceeded 20 million acres at the time of the 1855 Hellgate Treaty.

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Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation

Two Salish speaking groups, the Upper and Lower Chehalis, are the principle tribes that make up today’s Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation. Some Klallam, Muckleshoot, Nisqually, and Quinault peoples are also members of this federally recognized tribe.

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Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Twelve bands or tribes make up the federally recognized Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation indian tribe. Before the reservation era, each of these were separate tribes with their own culture and language.

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Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians

The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians trace their ancestry back to the aboriginal inhabitants of the South-Central coast of Oregon. The confederation is made up of three tribes (four Bands): two bands of Coos Tribes: Hanis Coos (Coos Proper), and Miluk Coos; the Lower Umpqua Tribe; and Siuslaw Tribe.

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Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation

The Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation include members of the Goshute, Paiute and Bannock tribes. They have retained strong ties to their culture and homeland, still depending heavily on wildlife and plant species on and off reservation. Most of the Goshute reside on the 113,000 acre reservation at the base of the Deep Creek mountain range.

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Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon

Twenty-seven native American tribes make up the modern day tribe known as the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon.  

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Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon

The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon generally include Clatsop, Chinook, Klickitat, Molala, Kalapuya, Tillamook, Alsea, Siuslaw/Lower Umpqua, Coos, Coquelle, Upper Umpqua, Tututni (including all the lower Rogue River Bands and those extending up the coast to Floras Creek and down to Whales Head), Chetco (including all of the villages from Whales Head to the Winchuck River), Tolowa, Takelma (including the Illinois Valley/mid-Rogue River and Cow Creek peoples), Galice/Applegate, and Shasta peoples.

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Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

The Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla tribes make up the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The reservation is located near Pendleton, Oregon in northeastern Oregon at the base of the Blue Mountains in the Columbia River Plateau.

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Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

The Walla Walla (later called the Warm Springs), Wasco, and Paiute tribes collectively make up the modern day Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Each tribe has its own unique history and heritage.

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Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation includes these bands: Kah-miltpah, Klickitat, Klinquit, Kow-was-say-ee, Li-ay-was,  Oche-Cotes, Palouse, Pesquose, See-ap-Cat, Sk’in-pah, Shyiks, Wisham, Wenachapam, and Yakama.

The Yakamas have lived in Central and South Central Washington since time immemorial. The lands of the Yakama extended in all directions along the Cascade Mountain Range to the Columbia River and beyond.  Tribal elders say their distance of travel sometimes took them as far north as Canada and as far south as California.

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Death Valley Timbi-Sha Shoshone Tribe

The Death Valley Timbi-sha Shoshone Tribe has a 40-acre federal reservation in  Death Valley (Inyo County), in south-central California, near the Nevada border.  This site is commonly known as Indian Village. They also have additional lands in and near Death Valley National Park.

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Coquille Indian Tribe

The federally recongnized Coqille Indian Tribe is descended from people who inhabited the watersheds of the Coquille River system, a small portion of Coos Bay at the South Slough, and areas north and south of the Coquille River mouth where it enters the ocean at present day Bandon, Oregon. 

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Cortina Indian Rancheria

Cortina Indian Rancheria  is a reservation for a federally recognized tribe of Wintun people. It is located about 15 miles west of Arbuckle, California. Wintun is the name generally given to a group of related Native American tribes who live in Northern California, including the Wintu (northern), Nomlaki (central), and Patwin (southern) tribes.

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Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana

The Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana is a federally recognized Native American Tribe. The Coushatta people live primarily in Louisiana, with most living in Allen Parish, just north of the town of Elton, Louisiana, and east of Kinder, Louisiana.

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Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

The Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians located in South Western Oregon is one of nine federally recognized Indian tribal governments in the State of Oregon.  

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Cowlitz Indian Tribe

The Cowlitz Indian Tribe is a federally recognized tribe of ancient Northwest Coast Salish people in Southwestern Washington state.

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Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California

The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California descended from the Shodakai Pomo. Shodakai means “Valley in the East.” In 1850, before Lake Mendocino existed, the land belonged to the Shodakai Pomo. This land was also a major Indian trail from Ukiah Valley to Potter Valley and Lake County. 

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Crow Tribe of Montana

The Crow Tribe of Montana is a federally recognized indian tribe which split off from the Hidatsa tribe in the 1400s. The Battle of the Little Big Horn occurred near where the agency headquarters is located today, about 100 miles from the present day city of Billings, Montana.

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Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe consists of the members of the Isanti and Ihanktowan  divisions of the Great Sioux Nation. The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe is composed of descendants of two Divisions of Dakota  and Nakota people. The Ihanktowan, or Yankton and Yanktonais are called the  Middle Sioux. The Isanti or Dakota people are comprised of four bands that lived  on the eastern side of the Dakota Nation.

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Delaware Nation

The Delaware Nation, or Lenape, also known as Lenni Lenape, signed the first-ever “Indian treaty” with the United States of America in 1778, and are the oldest known nation in the Eastern  US.

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Delaware Tribe of Indians

While the Delaware Indians were the first tribe to sign a treaty with the United States, they have just been successful in regaining federal recognition in 2002 as a separate tribe, now given the title of Delaware Tribe of Indians.

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Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians

The Pomo Indians, who are not one tribe but rather a group of more than 70  different tribes, have ties to the Alexander Valley, located along the Russian River between Healdsburg and Cloverdale in northern California, that date back as far as 12,000 years ago. Some of the descendants of these early inhabitants are now members of the  Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians.

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

The federally recognized Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is the only federally recognized tribe in the state of North Carolina. The Eastern Cherokee are those Cherokee people who remained on their traditional homelands when most of the Cherokee were forcibly relocated to Oklahoma. 

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Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

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The Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma are descended from the mixed Seneca-Shawnee band which left Lewistown, Ohio and came to the Indian Territory in 1832. Recognized as a separate tribe in 1867, they organized as the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma during the 1930s.

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Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians of the Sulphur Bank Rancheria

The Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians is the only Southeastern Pomo indian tribe that is a federally recognized tribal government. The Southeastern Pomo Tribes of Lake County, California were a united sovereign fishing and gathering nation that consisted of four main villages. Today, there are roughly 20 Pomo rancherias in northern California.

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Elk Valley Rancheria

Elk Valley Rancheria is a federal reservation of Tolowa Indians in Del Norte County, near Crescent City, on the Pacific Coast just south of the Oregon border. Some Yurok people are also enrolled in this ranceria. The Tolowa also live on the Smith River Rancheria.

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Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians

The Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians is a federally recognized Kumeyaay Indian tribe in California formerly known as the “Cuyapaipe Band of Mission Indians” or the “Cuyapaipe Community of Diegeuno Mission Indians of the Cuyapaipe Reservation.”

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Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria

The Bureau of Indian Affairs bought a 15-acre tract near Graton to be the “village home” of the Marshall, Bodega, Tomales and Sebastopol Indians in 1920. The government consolidated these neighboring groups into the Graton Rancheria thus establishing them as federally recognized tribes of American Indians, known today as the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. They are Southern Pomo and Coast Miwok peoples.

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Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota is a federally recognized tribe of Santee Dakota people. Their reservation is the Flandreau Indian Reservation. The tribe are members of the Mdewakantonwan people, one of the sub-tribes of the Isanti (Santee) Dakota originally from central Minnesota.

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Forest County Potawatomi Community

The Forest County Potawatomi Community belongs to an alliance known as the “Council of Three Fires” that was started long ago among three brothers who shared similar lands and backgrounds. Their decendants are of the Anishinabe (Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Ojibway) tribes and once lived mostly in the eastern part of North America. 

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Fort Belknap Indian Community of the Fort Belknap Reservation of Montana

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Who is the Fort Belknap Indian Community of the Fort Belknap Reservation of Montana?

This federally recognized tribe is made up of members from two tribes: the Assiniboine and the Gros Ventre.

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Fort Bidwell Indian Community of the Fort Bidwell Reservation of California

The Fort Bidwell Indian Community of the Fort Bidwell Reservation of California is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute Indians. The Paiute members are descended from the Northern Paiute Kidütökadö Band (Gidu Ticutta – “Yellow-bellied marmot-Eaters,” also called “Northern California Paiute”).  

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Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians of the Fort Independence Reservation

The Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians of the Fort Independence Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Paiute and Shoshone people in Inyo County, California.

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Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation

The Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribe is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute and Western Shoshone peoples, located in McDermitt, Nevada and Oregon. 

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Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation

The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation calls Central Arizona’s upper Sonoran Desert home. Located to the northeast of Phoenix within Maricopa County, Arizona, the 40-square mile reservation is a small part of the ancestral territory of the once nomadic Yavapai people, who hunted and gathered food in a vast area of Arizona’s desert lowlands and mountainous Mogollon Rim country. 

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Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California, and Nevada

When the Spanish arrived in the late 1500s, the Mojaves were the largest concentration of people in the Southwest. The land of the Mojave, the most northern of the Yuman tribes, stretched from Black Canyon to the Picacho Mountains below today’s Parker Dam, straddling the Colorado River. Today, this tribe is known as the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California, and Nevada.

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Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma

The Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma is made up of the descendants of the Chiricahua and Warm Springs Apache people that lived in Southern New Mexico until 1886, when they were forcibly removed and held by the U.S. Government as prisoners in Florida for 28 years.   The Chiricahua were the last American Indian group to be relocated to Indian Territory.

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Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation

The people of the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation are descencded from the Akimel O’odham, also known as Pima Indians, and the Pee Posh (Maricopa).

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Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

The federally recognized Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians are the people of the Three Fires Confederacy, the Odawa (Ottawa) the Ojibwa (Chippewa) and Bodowadomi (Pottawatomi) people.  

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