Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony

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The Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony is a tribe of Southern Paiute Indians.

Official Tribal Name: Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony

Address: 1 Paiute Drive, Las Vegas, NV  89106
Phone: (702)386-3926
Fax: (702) 383-4019
Email:

Official Website: http://lvpaiutetribe.com/

Recognition Status: Federally Recognized

Traditional Name / Traditional Meaning: Tudinu  meaning Desert People

Common Name / Meaning of Common Name:

Alternate names / Alternate spellings / Mispellings:

Name in other languages:

Region: Great Basin

State(s) Today: Nevada

Traditional Territory:

The ancestors of today’s Las Vegas Paiute Tribe, occupied the territory encompassing part of the Colorado River, most of Southeastern Nevada and parts of both Southern California and Utah. This included the lower Colorado River valley as well as the mountains and arroyos of the Mojave Desert in Nevada, California and Utah.

Confederacy: Southern Paiute

Treaties:

Reservation: Las Vegas Indian Colony

On December 30, 1911, ranch owner Helen J. Stewart deeded 10 acres in downtown Las Vegas to the Paiutes, establishing the Las Vegas Paiute Colony.

17 April, 1912 – purchase of 10 acres ( Is this the same as above?)

Later through an Act of Congress on December 2, 1983, an additional 3,840.15 acres of land returned to Paiute possession at what is now the Snow Mountain Reservation. Part of this land is now the Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort.

Land Area:  3,850.15 acres of Tribal Land
Location: Within the city limits on the west side of Main Street, one mile north of downtown Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada/ Also, North of Las Vegas along the Reno-Tonopah Highway, near the Mt. Charleston turnoff.
Tribal Headquarters: Las Vegas, NV 
Time Zone:  Pacific

Population at Contact:

Registered Population Today:

 In 1992, there were 71 enrolled members.

Tribal Enrollment Requirements:

Genealogy Resources:

Government:

Charter: The Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934, in conjunction with the Las Vegas Paiute Tribal Constitution, approved on July 22, 1970, recognized the Tribe as a Sovereign Nation. 

Name of Governing Body:  Tribal Council
Number of Council members:   5 plus executive officers
Dates of Constitutional amendments: 
Number of Executive Officers:  Chairperson and Co- Chairperson

Elections:

B.I.A. Agency:

Southern Paiute Field Station
Cedar City, Utah 84727
Phone:(801) 586-1121

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Origins:

Bands, Gens, and Clans

Related Tribes:
Duck Valley Paiute
| Pyramid Lake Paiute | Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe | Fort Independence Paiute | Ft. McDermitt Paiute-Shoshone Tribe | Goshute Confederated Tribes | Kaibab Band of Paiute | Lovelock Paiute Tribe | Moapa River Reservation | Reno/Sparks Indian Colony | Summit Lake Paiute Tribe | Winnemucca Colony | Walker River Paiute Tribe | Yerington Paiute Tribe

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Ceremonies / Dances:

Modern Day Events & Tourism:

Annual Snow Mountain Pow Wow held Memorial Day weekend (usually 4th weekend in May)
Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort –  The Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort on the Snow Mountain Indian Reservation is on par with the rest of Las Vegas’ world-class resorts, and its three courses—Snow Mountain, Sun Mountain, and Wolf—have each received four-and-a-half-star ratings from Golf Digest. The 50,000-square-foot clubhouse features a full restaurant and bar and includes the largest golf shop in the state.

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Art & Crafts:

 Famous for their high quality baskets, some beadwork

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Economy Today:

The tribe owns a smoke shop in the city of Las Vegas  and three golf resorts. They also operate a Smokeshop and gas station at the Snow Mountain Reservation.

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