Greenville Rancheria

The federally recognized Greenville Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California is currently located in the Indian Valley at the 3,500 foot level in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. 

Grindstone Indian Rancheria of Wintun-Wailaki Indians of California

The Grindstone Indian Rancheria of Wintun-Wailaki Indians is a federally recognized tribe and ranchería of Wintun and Wailaki Indians from northern California. 

Guidiville Rancheria of California

The federally recognized Guidiville Rancheria of California is a Pomo tribe located in Mendocino County, California. During the California Gold Rush, an influx of non-Indian settlers drove the Guidiville Pomos from their ancestral lands near Lake County, California into Mendocino County.

Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake

The federally recognized Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake have lived in central and northern California since before recorded time.

Hannahville Indian Community

The Hannahville Indian Community is a Potawatomi tribe located in the south-central section of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in Menominee Country, 20 miles west of Escanaba, MI and 95 miles northeast of Green Bay, WI.

Havasupai Tribe of the Havasupai Reservation

Beaver Falls in the Havasupai reservation in the Grand Canyon

The Havasupai Tribe of the Havasupai Reservation is a federally recognized American Indian tribe who has lived in the Grand Canyon for at least the past 800 years. 

Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin

The Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, formerly known as the Wisconsin Winnebago Tribe, is one of two federally recognized tribes of Ho-Chunk people.  

Hoh Indian Tribe

The Hoh Indian Tribe are considered to be a band of the Quileutes but are recognized as a separate tribe. Located at the mouth of the Hoh River on the western Olympic Peninsula in Washington State, the tiny Hoh Indian Tribe is dependent on the fish and wildlife of the Hoh River for their subsistence and commercial economy.  This federally recognized indian tribe takes it’s name from the principal river in their territory.

Hoopa Valley Tribe

The People of Hoopa Valley are one of California’s first cultures. They came up the Trinity River into the rich valley which has always been the center of the Hupa World, the place where the trails return. Legends say this is where the people of the Hoopa Valley Tribe came into being. 

Hopi Tribe of Arizona

The federally recognized Hopi Tribe of Arizona lives in northeastern Arizona in twelve villages on three mesas.

Hopland Band of Pomo Indians

The Hopland Band of Pomo Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Pomo people. 

Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians

The Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians belonged to the loose confederation of eastern American Indians known as the Wabanaki Alliance, together with the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Mi’kmaq, and Abenaki Indians. The Maliseet live primarily in Canada, especially New Brunswick, with one band across the border in nearby Maine.

Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel

The Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel is a part of the larger Kumeyaay people that once populated much of the geographic area of present day San Diego County. On November 20, 2007, the Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, by a majority ballot vote of the General Membership, certified the adoption of a new Tribal Constitution for self-governance. 

Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation

The Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians. 

Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California

The Ione Band of Miwok Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Miwok people in Amador County, California. 

Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska

The Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska is located along the Missouri River on an approximately 2,100-acre reservation straddling the borders of northeast Kansas (Brown County) and southeast Nebraska (Richardson County). 

Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma is a federally recognized indian tribe which split off from the main Iowa Tribe now located in Kansas and Nebraska in the late 1800s.

Jackson Band of Miwuk Indians

The Jackson Band of Miwuk Indians was first recognized by the Federal Government in 1898. The Tribe held a meeting in 1979 and established a formal government. They are a federally recognized tribe of Miwok people.

Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe

Jamestown S'Kallam Map

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe is a federally recognized Salish indian tribe that resides on the northeastern portion of the Olympic Peninsula, in northwestern Washington.

Jamul Indian Village of California

Sixty-five years ago a small band of Tipai found themselves with six acres upon which to settle – a tiny plot in the rolling hills east of the town of Jamul.  After 65 years of tenacious endurance, the Jamul Indian Village of California was rewarded with their village finally being declared a reservation and federally recognized indian tribe.

Jena Band of Choctaw Indians

Chippewa Cree t-shirt

The Jena Band of Choctaw Indians are native to the Southeastern United States and members of the Muskogean linguistic family, which traces its roots to a mound-building, maize-based society that flourished in the Mississippi River Valley for more than a thousand years before European contact.  They are a federally recognized indian tribe.

Jicarilla Apache Nation

Dulce Lake on Jicarilla Apache Reservation

The Jicarilla Apache Nation  is located in the mountains and rugged mesas of northern New Mexico. The Jicarilla people were one of six southern Athabaskan groups who migrated out of Canada sometime between 1300 AD and 1500 AD.

Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians of the Kaibab Indian Reservation

 The Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians are members of the Southern Paiute Nation and a federally recognized indian tribe.

Kalispel Indian Community of the Kalispel Reservation

The Kalispel Indian Community of the Kalispel Reservation are a federally recognized tribe of Lower Kalispel people, located in Washington.

Karuk Tribe Index

The Karuk tribe is the second largest indigenous tribe in the state of California. Most Karuk people are enrolled in the Karuk Tribe; however, some are enrolled in the Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, located in Humboldt County, California. The Quartz Valley Rancheria of Karok, Shasta, and Upper Klamath Indians is also a federally recognized tribal entity.

Kashia Band of Pomo Indians of the Stewarts Point Rancheria

The Kashia Band of Pomo Indians of Stewarts Point Rancheria is a Federally Recognized Pomo Tribe located in Sonoma County of California. The Kashia Band of Pomo Indians were the first inhabitants of the coastal Sonoma County area around Fort Ross.

Kaw Nation

The Kaw Nation is a federally recognized indian tribe in Oklahoma that were originally from the Midwest area that is now Kansas. The state of Kansas is named after this tribe.

Kewa Pueblo

The Kewa Pueblo, formerly known as Santo Domingo Pueblo, is one of the best known tribes of the southwest, largely because of their skill in marketing their jewelry and other crafts. The Kewa Pueblo is fifth in population of the nineteen New Mexico pueblos, and is generally considered the most conservative in terms of customs and culture.  

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community is a federally recognized Ojibwe tribe in Michigan.

Kialegee Tribal Town

Kialegee Tribal Town is headquartered in Wetumka, Oklahoma. It is a federally recognized indian tribe that was once part of the Muscogee Creek Confederacy.

Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas

The Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas is a federally recognized tribe in the United States. The Kickapoo were once one of many Great Lakes Tribes that occupied the western portion of the woodland area in southern Michigan near Lake Erie until the Iroquois forced them out during the Iroquois War of 1641-1701.

Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma

The Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma is one of three federally recognized Kickapoo tribes in the United States. There is a fourth in Mexico.

Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas

The Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas were originally an offshoot of the Shawnee tribe (“Kickapoo” is thought to be a corruption of a Shawnee word for “wanderers,”) but their language and customs have more in common with the neighboring Fox and Sauk.

Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma

Although in some ways the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma displayed a typical Plains Indian culture, they had an effective and well organized military strategy and were thought to be one of the most warlike tribes. 

Klamath Tribes

Klamath Tribes protest

The Klamath Tribes include Klamath, Modoc, and Yahooskin, another band of Klamath erroneously believed to be a group of Paiute or Shoshone because they were designated the Yahooskin Band of Snake in the 1864 treaty. They all lived in the Klamath Basin of Oregon.

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

Bonner's Ferry along the Kootenai River

The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho is a federally recognized tribe indigenous to the Northwest Plateau.

La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians

La Jolla Indian Reservation is home to the Luiseno (Payomkawichum) people, and has been for at least the last 10,000 years. Today, there are about 700 La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians tribal members located in the foothills of the beautiful Palomar Mountains, on the banks of the San Luis Rey River, in the semi-wilderness now known as the La Jolla Indian Reservation.

La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation

The La Posta Band of Mission Indians have their homeland under the shadow of 6,270-foot-high Mt. Laguna and at the eastern edge of Cleveland National Forest in a 3,756-acre park-like highland. La Posta has occasional residents, who value and guard their privacy. The one entry road is dusty or muddy, and is fenced off from intruders.

Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin

The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin people are one band of the large Ojibwe Nation that originally occupied the upper eastern woodlands area of the North American continent.

Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin

The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians is primarily associated with the Lac du Flambeau Reservation in Wisconsin. The Lake Superior Chippewa (Anishinaabe: Gichigamiwininiwag) were a large historical band of Ojibwe (Anishinaabe) Indians living around Lake Superior in what is now the northern parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.

Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan

The Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians were originally part ofthe Keweenaw Bay Band and resided in the Watersmeet area. They received federal recognition as a separate tribe in 1988.

Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony

The Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony is a tribe of Southern Paiute Indians.

Little River Band of Ottawa Indians

The Little River Ottawa descend from members of certain Grand River Ottawa Bands who lived in villages located on the Manistee River, Pere Marquette River, and at several villages on the Grand River system in Michigan.

Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians

On Sept. 21, 1994, the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB) was federally reaffirmed under Public Law 103-324, signed into law by President Clinton.

Koi Nation of Northern California

The Koi Nation of the Lower Lake Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Southeastern Pomo people located in Sonoma County, California. 

Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians

Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians of the Los Coyotes Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Cahuilla and Cupeño Indians, who are Mission Indians located in California.

Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony

The Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute Indians.

Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the Lower Brule Reservation

The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a sovereign nation defined by its government-to-government relationship with the United States. The Tribe was chartered under the Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934.

Lower Elwha Tribal Community

The Lower Elwha Tribal Community is a federally recognized nation in Washington state in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The tribe is part of the larger Klallam culture, one of the Coast Salish peoples.

Lower Sioux Indian Community in the State of Minnesota

The Lower Sioux Indian Community is a federally recognized Indian tribe located in south central Minnesota in Redwood County, approximately two miles south of Morton.

Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation

The federally recognized Lummi Nation is the third largest tribe in Washington State. The Lummi are the original inhabitants of Washington’s northernmost coast and southern British Columbia. For thousands of years, they have lived on the shores and waters of Puget Sound.

Lytton Rancheria of California

The Lytton Band of Pomo Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Achomawi, Nomlaki and Pomo Indians. The tribe was founded in 1937 by Bert Steele, who was one-quarter Achomawi and part Nomlaki, and his wife, a Pomo from Bodega Bay, when they successfully petitioned the U.S. Office of Indian Affairs for the right to build on a 50-acre (200,000 m2) plot north of Healdsburg, California north of Lytton Station Road after Steele’s home was destroyed in a flood. Along with his brother-in-law, John Myers, and his wife, Mary Myers Steele (both Pomo from Sonoma), he moved onto the land, which the government had set aside for Native Americans. This land became the Lytton Rancheria and the namesake for the tribe.

Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

The Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation are a federally recognized tribe of Makah Indians. Linguistically and ethnographically, they are closely related to the Nuu-chah-nulth and Ditidaht peoples of the West Coast of Vancouver Island, who live across the Strait of Juan de Fuca in British Columbia, Canada.

Manchester Band of Pomo Indians of the Manchester Rancheria

The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians of the Manchester Rancheria is a federally recognized tribe of Pomo Indians in California.

Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation

The Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation are a federally recognized Kumeyaay band in California.

Mashantucket Pequot Indian Tribe

The Mashantucket Pequot Indian Tribe is an Eastern Woodland people with traditional homelands in what is now known as Southeastern Connecticut. As the first native people within the borders of the continental United States to suffer an attempted genocide by Puritan Colonists in 1637, they have one of America’s oldest Indian reservations, established in 1666.

Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe is is one of two federally recognized tribes of Wampanoag people in Massachusetts. They were one of the first tribes encountered by Europeans, but did not receive federal recognition as a tribe until 2007.

Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan

Federal recognition of the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan became effective on August 23, 1999. The tribe says they are a body of mixed-blood Chippewa, Ottawa, and Pottawatomi who trace their descent from principal Potawatomi chief, Match-e-be-nash-she-wish. 

Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria

The Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria are a federally recognized tribe of Maidu people located in California. Their federal recognition was terminated in 1967, but reinstated in 1992.

Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, or “wild rice people,” are a federally recognized Indian tribe who have lived in Wisconsin for millenia. They are the oldest Native American community that still lives there.

Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation

Although closely related to and only a couple of miles distance from Santa Ysabel, the Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians is a group that cherishes a singular independence.

Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation

The Mescalero Apache tribe formed a part of the Faraones and Vaqueros of different periods of the Spanish history of the southwest. Their principal range was between the Rio Grande and the Pecos River in New Mexico, but it extended also into the Staked plains and southward into Coahuila, Mexico.

Miami Tribe of Oklahoma

The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma is the only federally recognized Native American tribe of Miami Indians in the United States.

Miccosukee Tribe of Indians

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Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California

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Minnesota Chippewa Tribe

Who are the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe?

The Minnesota Chippewa Tribe is a federally recognized political union of six Ojibwe bands, including the Mille Lacs Band, Bois Forte Band, Fond du Lac Band, Grand Portage Band, Leech Lake Band, and White Earth Band. There are Ojibwe communities in both Canada and the United States. In Canada, they are the second-largest population among First Nations, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fourth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee and Lakota.

Texas Band of Choctaw Indians

Chippewa Cree t-shirt

Brief Summary  

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

Chippewa Cree t-shirt

The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians was native to the Southeastern United States and members of the Muskogean linguistic family, which traces its roots to a mound-building, maize-based society that flourished in the Mississippi River Valley for more than a thousand years before European contact.  

Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian Reservation

The Moapa Band of Paiute Indians are Southern Paiutes. They were relocated to to the Moapa area in 1869. Originally the entire Moapa River watershed and lands along the Colorado River (some of which area is now under Lake Mead) was assigned to the Moapa; however, in 1875 their reservation was reduced to 1,000 acres (4.0 km2).

Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma

The Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma territory was as much in present-day Oregon as in California.  Their language and customs were closely related to the Klamath people, who lived in Oregon, and some Modocs share another reservation with the Klamath people in Oregon.  The Modoc did, however, occupy a part of California that is today known as Modoc County. They also shared some customs with the Shasta to the west, and with the Achumawi to the south.

Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut

When European settlers arrived in this region, the Mohegan and the Pequot were one tribe, living under the rule of Sassacus. Later Uncas, a subordinate chief, rebelled against Sassacus and assumed the leadership of a small group on the Thames River near Norwich. This group was known as the Mohegan. Today they are the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut.

Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California

The Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Concow and Maidu people. Concow people are the northwestern or foothill branch of the Maidu people.

Morongo Band of Mission Indians

The Morongo Band of Mission Indians is a federally recognized tribe of primarily Cahuilla and Serrano peple. Tribal members also include Cupeño, Luiseño, and Chemehuevi Indians.

Muckleshoot Indian Tribe

The federally recognized Muckleshoot Indian Tribe are a Lushootseed Native American tribe, part of the Coast Salish peoples of the Pacific Northwest.  They are composed of descendants of various tribal groups who inhabited Central Puget Sound and occupied the Green and White River drainages from the rivers’ confluence in present-day Auburn to their headwaters in the Cascades.

Narragansett Indian Tribe

The Narragansett Indian Tribe of Rhode Island were a water-going people capable of building dugout canoes that could hold as many as 40 men.

Navajo Nation

The Navajo Nation is the largest indian tribe in the United States, with over 250,000 enrolled members and also has the largest indian reservation, covering approximately 27,425 square miles (71,000 km2). The Navajo also have the most complex tribal council, with 88 council delegates representing 110 Navajo Nation chapters (communities).

Nez Perce Tribe

The Nez Perce Tribe is one of five federally recognized tribes in the state of Idaho. Their most famous chief is Chief Joseph.

Nisqually Indian Tribe

The Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Nisqually people. They are a Coast Salish tribe of the Pacific Northwest.

Nooksack Indian Tribe

The Nooksack Indian Tribe is a federally recognized Salish tribe near the Northwest Coast in northern Washington State located about 15 miles from the Canadian border. Their oral history says they have resided there since time immemorial. 

Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation

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Northfork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California

The North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California is a federally recognized tribe of Western Mono Indians, whose traditional homeland is in the southern Sierra Nevada foothills of California.

Northwestern Band of Shoshoni Nation

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Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi

The Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi received federal recognition in 1995 by Congressional legislation.

Oglala Sioux Tribe

Allen, SD on the Pine Ridge Reservation

The Oglala Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized indian tribe who are members of a major Sioux division known as the Western or Teton Sioux. The Lakota are the westernmost of the three Siouan language groups. The tribe prefers to be known as the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Ohkay Owingeh

Ohkay Owingeh is an Indian pueblo and census-designated place in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. This pueblo was founded around 1200 AD. These pueblo people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans.

Omaha Tribe of Nebraska

The Omaha are a federally recognized Native American tribe which lives on the Omaha Reservation in northeastern Nebraska and western Iowa. They migrated to the upper Missouri area and the Great Plains by the late 17th century from earlier locations in the Ohio River Valley. The Omaha tribe were the first tribe on the Northern Plains to adopt an equestrian culture.

Oneida Nation of New York

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Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin

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Onondaga Nation

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Osage Nation

The Osage Nation is a federally recognized Midwestern Siouan-speaking tribe in the United States that originated in the Ohio River valley in what is present-day Kentucky. They were eventually removed to Indian Territory in Oklahoma, where their reservation is today.

Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma

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Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians

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Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah

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Bishop Paiute Tribe

Home :: US Tribes A to Z :: US Tribes A-B :: Bishop Paiute Tribe

The Bishop Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized indian tribe in California, located at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. They are the fifth largest tribe in California with around 2,000 enrolled members.

The Paiute people who live on the Bishop Paiute Reservation are descendants of the “Nu-Mu”, the original people of the Owens Valley.

Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony

The Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute and Western Shoshone Indians in Churchill County, Nevada.

Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribe

The Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribe is a federally recognized tribe of Mono Paiute and Timbisha Shoshone located near Lone Pine in Inyo County, California.

Pala Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pala Reservation

Many of the Pala Band of Luiseno Mission Indians trace their heritage back to the Cupa. Today, more than 90 years after having been expelled from their native homeland, the Cupenos call Pala, California home and live as one among the Luiseno tribe.

Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona

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Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians of California

The Hill Nomlaki and River Nomlaki were the two major divisions of Nomlaki Indians in California. The Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians are Hill Nomlaki occupying the territory east of the Coastal Range now known as Tehama and Glenn Counties.

Passamaquoddy Tribe

The Passamaquoddy Tribe belonged to the loose confederation of eastern American Indians known as the Wabanaki Alliance, together with the Maliseet, Mi’kmaq, Abenaki, and Penobscot Indians. The Passamaquoddy live primarily in Maine, although there is also a band of a few hundred Passamaquoddy people in New Brunswick.