Louisiana Indian Tribes


LOUISIANA TRIBES FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED TRIBES (Federal List Last Updated 5/16) Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana-1925 John Paul Darden, Chairman P. O. Box 661 Charenton, LA 70523 Phone: 337-923-7215 Fax: 337-923-6848 Website: www.chitimacha.gov Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana-1971 Kevin Sickey, Chairman 1940 CC Bel Elton, LA 70532 Phone: 337-584-2261 Fax: 337-584-2998 Website: www.coushattatribela.org Jena Band of Choctaw Indians-1995 Beverly Cheryl Smith, Chief P. O. Box 14 Jena, LA 71432 Phone:  318-992-2717 Fax: 318-992-8244 Website: www.jenachoctaw.org Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana-1981 Earl Barbry, Sr, Chairman P. O. Box 1589 Marksville, LA 71351 Phone: 318-253-9767 Fax: 318-253-9791 Website: www.tunica.org STATE RECOGNIZED TRIBES(Not recognized by the Federal Governemnt) Adai Caddo Indian Nation- 1993 Rufus Davis Jr., Chief 4500 Hwy 485 Robeline, LA 71469 Phone: 318-472-8680 Fax: 318-472-8684 Website: www.adaiindiannation.com Letter of Intent to Petition for Federal Recognition 09/13/1993. Bayou Lafourche Band of the Biloxi-Chitimacha Confederation of Muskogees (separated from United Houma Nation, Inc.) Letter of Intent to Petition 10/24/1995. Bayou Lafourche Band - 2005 Randy Verdun, Chief P. O. Box 856 Zachary, LA 70791 Phone: 225-359-2476 Website: www.biloxi-chitimacha.com Grand Caillou/Dulac Band of the Biloxi-Chitimacha Confederation of Muskogees- 2005                                           Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar5057 Bayouside Dr.Chauvin, LA 70344Phone: 985-466-3038Email: [email protected]                                              Website: Isle de Jean Charles Band of the Biloxi-Chitimacha Confederation of Muskogees- 2005 Albert Naquin, Chief 100 Dennis Street Montegut, LA 70377 Phone: (985) 594-3725 Website: www.biloxi-chitimacha.com Choctaw – Apache Community of Ebarb - 1978 John Porcell, Chief P. O. Box 1428 Zwolle, LA 71486 Phone: 318-645-6712 Fax: 318-645-2588 Website: Letter of Intent to Petition 07/02/1978 Clifton Choctaw Tribe - 1978  (aka Clifton Choctaw Reservation Inc.) Tom Neal, Chairman 1312 Clifton Road Gardner, LA 71447 Phone: 318-793-4253 Fax: 318-793-4211 Letter of Intent to Petition 03/22/1978 Four Winds Cherokee Tribe - 1997 La. Cherokee Confederacy Jackie Myers Womack, Principal Chief 306 W. 1st Street Deridder, LA 70634 Phone: 337-463-7501 Fax: 337-537-1697 Website: http://www.fourwindscherokee.com/ Louisiana Band of Choctaw Shaun Murphy, Chief 225-620-8676[email protected] Pointe-Au-Chien Tribe – 2004 (separated from United Houma Nation, Inc.). Letter of Intent to Petition 7/22/1996. Charles Verdin Sr., Chairman P. O. Box 416 Montegut, LA 70377 Phone: 985-594-6250 United Houma Nation – 1972 Thomas DarDar Jr.- Principal Chief 20986 Hwy 1 Golden Meadow, LA 70357 Phone: 985-475-6640 Fax: 985-475-7109 Website: www.unitedhoumanation.org Letter of Intent to Petition 07/10/1979; Proposed Finding 12/22/1994, 59 FR 6618.Denied federal recognition. UNRECOGNIZED / PETITIONING TRIBES Atakapas-Ishak Nation Chief Michael Amos P.O. Box 1532 Lake Charles, LA  70602 (409) 728-0394 Attakapas Opelousas Prairie Tribe of SWLAChief Nolan Gobert2166 Hwy 190Elton, LA 70532(337) 584-2260[email protected] Avogel, Okla Tasannuk, Tribe/Nation IncMickey Baptiste, Principal ChiefP.O. Box 759Mansura, LA 71350-0759(318) 253-5528 [email protected] Letter of Intent to Petition 11/13/2000. Canneci Nde' Band of Lipan Apache, Inc.CougarGoodBear, ChairmanAlfreda Mathieu, Tribal SecretaryLouann Mathieu-Moses, TreasurerP.O. Box 93325Lafayette, LA 70509Email Address:  [email protected]Phone: (337) 781-9632Website:  www.canneci-lipan-apaches.webs.com Chahta Tribe Chief Elwin Warhorse Gillum 61357 Dixe Ranch Rd, Slidell  70460 (985) 781-7650 Louisiana Choctaw Turtle Tribe Chief James “Graywolf” Gill 379 Sharon Lane Lake Charles, LA  70611 (337) 855-4427 Talimali Band Apalache of Louisiana Gilmer Bennett P. O. Box 84 Libuse, LA 71348 Phone: (318) 561-2333 (formerly Apalachee Indians of Louisiana). Letter of Intent to Petition 2/5/1996. Apalachee Indian Tribe. Letter of Intent to Petition 01/22/1996. Avoyel-Kaskaskia Tribe of Louisiana. Letter of Intent to Petition 6/20/2005. The Avoyel-Taensa Tribe/Nation of Louisiana Inc. Letter of Intent to Petition 1/9/2003. Kispoko Sept of Ohio Shawnee. FIRST CONTACT TO PRESENT At the time of European exploration in the 16th century, there were more than 10,000 Indians in Louisiana. By about 1700, there were probably as many as 15,000 Indians living in the area, representing six different linguistic groups: the Caddo, the Natchez, the Atakapa, the Chitimachan, the Muskogean and the Tunican. Most tribes survived on a combination of agriculture, hunting, and fishing. Usually, the men were responsible for ruling and defending the tribal community. They also constructed the community’s buildings and canoes, and hunted. Women cared for children and the elderly, planted crops and made clothes and utensils. Clothing was often made of bark, hides, and feathers. Both men and women wore body ornaments like necklaces, armbands, rings, and ear and nose plugs made from shells, pearls, and copper. Although religious practices differed from tribe to tribe, most Louisiana Indians believed that humans needed to be in harmony with nature, and honored their dead with burial mounds, and celebrations of dance, song, and food. Natives lived and worshipped in houses thatched with palmetto branches, or made of grass or traditional wattle and daub. Native people also enjoyed themselves with various games and sporting events like wrestling, foot races, archery, dice, dancing and music. PRE-CONTACT LOUISIANA TRIBES PRE-HISTORIC CULTURES IN LOUISIANA 10,000 years ago - Earliest inhabitants of the area were probably nomads who hunted big game.   6,000 years ago. - Tribes of the Muskhogean language family occupied the east-central and south-east region, Tunican tribes lived along the coast and in the northeast, and tribes of the Caddoan group inhabited the north and northwest.   2,000 years ago - Farming in the area.   700 BC - Excavation at Poverty Point reveals that a highly organized society lived there. The Louisiana region was settled by Indians in prehistoric times, at least as early as 6,000 years ago. Tribes of the Muskhogean language family occupied the east-central and south-east region, Tunican tribes lived along the coast and in the northeast, and tribes of the Caddoan group inhabited the north and northwest. The earliest inhabitants of the area we now call Louisiana were probably nomads who hunted big game as early as 10,000 years ago. Archaeologists tell us that farming in the area began around 2,000 years ago with the cultivation of crops such as squash, sunflowers, beans and maize. Excavation at Poverty Point reveals that a highly organized society lived there from around 700 B.C. Groups of indigenous peoples lived and farmed in the area up until the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century. RESOURCES Sources of records on US Indian tribes