At one time, more than fourty Assiniboine bands roamed North America. Modern scholars say they split from the main Sioux tribes in the early 1700s, but the Assiniboine people say they have always been a separate tribe.

Buy Assiniboine T-shirtThe names of the Assiniboine bands are:

  • Aegitina (‘Camp Moves to the Kill’)
  • Bizebina (‘Gophers’)
  • Cepahubi (‘Large Organs’)
  • Canhdada (‘Moldy People’)
  • Canhewincasta (‘Wooded-Mountain People’ or ‘Wood Mountain People’ - ‘People Who live around Wood Mountain’)
  • Canknuhabi (‘Ones That Carry Their Wood’)
  • Hudesabina (‘Red Bottom’ or ‘Red Root’, split off from the Wadopabina in 1844)
  • Hebina (Ye Xa Yabine, ‘Rock Mountain People’, often called Strong Wood or Thickwood Assiniboine, later a core band of the Mountain Stoney-Nakoda)
  • Huhumasmibi (‘Bone Cleaners’)
  • Huhuganebabi (‘Bone Chippers’)
  • Hen atonwaabina (‘Little Rock Mountain People’)
  • Inyantonwanbina (‘Stone People’ or ‘Rock People’, later known as Nakoda (Stoney))
  • Inninaonbi (‘Quiet People’)
  • Insaombi (‘The Ones Who Stay Alone’, also known as Cypress Hills Assiniboine)
  • Indogahwincasta (‘East People’)
  • Minisose Swnkeebi (‘Missouri River Dog Band’)
  • Minisatonwanbi (‘Red Water People’)
  • Osnibi (‘People of the Cold’)
  • Ptegabina (‘Swamp People’)
  • Sunkcebi (‘Dog Band’)
  • Sahiyaiyeskabi (‘Plains Cree-Speakers’, also known as Cree-Assiniboine / Young Dogs)
  • Snugabi (‘Contrary People’)
  • Sihabi (‘Foot People’)
  • Tanidabi (‘Buffalo Hip’)
  • Tokanbi (‘Strangers’)
  • Tanzinapebina (‘Owners of Sharp Knives’)
  • Unskaha (‘Roamers’)
  • Wadopabina (‘Canoe Paddlers’)
  • Wadopahnatonwan (‘Canoe Paddlerrs Who Live on the Prairie’)
  • Wiciyabina (‘Ones That Go to the Dance’)
  • Waziyamwincasta (‘People of the North’)
  • Wasinazinyabi (‘Fat Smokers’)
  • Wokpanbi (‘Meat Bag’)