Wilton Rancheria

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Wilton Rancheria is a federally recognized Native American tribe of Miwok people. They were formed from Wilton Rancheria Miwok and the Me-Wuk Indian Community of the Wilton Rancheria. They are descendants of the Plains and Sierra Miwok who lived and prospered in the Sacramento Valley.

Official Tribal Name: Wilton Rancheria

Address:  9728 Kent Street, Elk Grove, CA, 95624 
Phone: 916-683-6000 
Fax: 916-683-6015 
Email: [email protected]

Official Website: wiltonrancheria-nsn.gov/

Recognition Status: Federally Recognized

Traditional Name / Traditional Meaning: Mi-wuk  means “people.”

Common Name / Meaning of Common Name: Wilton Rancheria

Alternate names / Alternate spellings: Miwok, Me-Wuk, Mi-wuk

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Region: California

State(s) Today: California

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Reservations: Wilton Rancheria
Land Area:   38.5 acres 
Tribal Headquarters:  Elk Grove, California
Time Zone:  Pacific
 

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Registered Population Today: Approximately 600 people.

Tribal Enrollment Requirements: All persons listed as distributees or dependant members in A Plan for Distribution of the Assets of the Wilton Rancheria, According to the Provisions of Public Law 85-671, Enacted by the 85th Congress, Approved August 18, 1958, as approved by the deputy commissioner of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Indian Affairs on July 6, 1959; and all lineal descendants of an individual listed therein.

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Name of Governing Body:  Tribal Council
Number of Council members:  5 councilmen, plus executive officers
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Number of Executive Officers:  Chairman, Vice-Chairman, 2 Spokespersons

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This tribe was terminated in 1958 under the California Rancheria Act, an Indian termination policy. The tribe regained federal recognition as a federal tribe on June 13, 2009.

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