Extinct Tribes N to P


An alphabetical list of extinct native american indian tribes of the United States N to P.

Each tribal profile explains who they were, where they lived, how they lived, an account of first contact with Europeans, population if known, and a brief explanation of what happed to them.

Links to tribal profile pages are at the bottom of the page.

A-C   D-G   H-J  K-M    N-P   Q-S   T-V   W-Z

Some Extinct, Some Not?

NABEDACHES, (Caddo,) on branch Sabine, 15 m. above the Inies; 400 in 1805. NABIJOS, between N. Mexico and the Pacific ; live in stone houses, and manufacture. NANDAKOES, 120 in 1805, on Sabine, 60 m. W. of the Yattassees ; (Caddo.) NANTIKOKES, 1711, on Nantikoke River; 1755, at Wyoming; same year went west. NARCOTAR, the name by which the Sioux know themselves. NARRAGANSETS, S. side of the bay which perpetuates their name; nearly extinct. NASHUAYS, (Nipmuks,) on that river from its mouth, in Massachusetts. NATCHEZ, at Natchez ; discovered, 1701 ; chiefly destroyed by French, 1720. NATCHITOCHES, once at that place; 100 in 1804; now upon Red River. NATEOTETAINS, 200 in 1820, W. R., on a river of their name, W. of the Facullies. NATIKS, (Nipmuks,) in Massachusetts, in a town now called after them. NECHACOKE, (Wappatoo,) 100 in 1820, S. side Columbia, near Quicksand r., W. R. NEEKEETOO, 700 in 1820, on the Pacific, S. of the Columbia, beyond the Youicone. NEMALQUINNER, (Wappatoo,) 200 in 1820, N. side Wallaumut River, 3 m. up. NIANTIES, a tribe of the Narragansets, and in alliance with them, p. 131. NICARIAGAS, once about Michilimakinak ; joined Iroquois in 1723, as seventh nation NIPISSINS, (original Algonkins,) 400 in 1764, near the source of Ottoway River. NIPMUICS, eastern interior of Mass. ; 1,500 in 1775 ; extinct. See p. 82, 104, 164, 276. NORRIDGEWOKS, (Abenakies,) on Penobscot River. See Book iii. 303, 311. NOTTOWAYS, on Nottoway River, in Virginia; but 2 of clear blood in 1817. NYACKS, (Mohicans,) or MANHATTANS, once about the Narrows, in New York.OAKMULGES, (Muskogees,) to the E. of Flint River; about 200 in 1834. OCAMECHES, in Virginia in 1607; had before been powerful; then reduced. OCHEES. See UCHEES. - Perhaps Ochesos; 230 in Florida in 1826, at Ochee Bluff OCONAS, (Creeks.) See Book iv. 369. OJIBWAS, (Chippeways,) 30,000 in 1836, about the great lakes, and N. of them. OKATIOKINANS, (Seminoles,) 580 in 1820, near Fort Gaines, E. side Mississippi. OMAHAS, 2,200 in 1820, on Elkhorn River, 80 m. front Council Bluffs. ONEIDAS, one of the Five Nations ; chief seat near Oneida Lake, New York. ONONDAGAS, one of the Five Nations; formerly in New York; 300 in 1840. OOTLASHOOTS, (Tushepahas,) 400 in 1820, on Clark's River, W. Rocky Mountains. OSAOES, 4,000 in 1830, about Arkansas and Osage Rivers; many tribes. OTAGAMIES, (Winnebagoes,) 300 in 1780, betw. Lake of the Woods and the Mississ. OTOES, 1,500 in 1820; in 1805, 500; 15 leagues up the River Platte, on S. side. OTTAWAS, 1670, removed from L. Superior to Michilimakinak ; 2,800 in 1820. OUIATANONS, or WAAS, (Kikapoos,) mouth of Eel r., Ind., 1791, in a village 3 m. long OUMAS, E. bank Mississippi in 1722, in 2 villages, quarter of a mile front the river. OWASSISSAS, (Seminoles,) 100 in 1820, on E. waters of St. Mark's River. OWAS, 2,000 in 1750; on Ozaw River in 1780, which flows into the Mississippi. OZIMIES, one of the six tribes on E. shore of Maryland and Virginia in 1607.PACANAS, on Quelquechose River, La. ; 30 men in 1805 ; 40 m. S. W. Natchitoches. PADOUCAS, 2,000 warriors in 1721, on the Kansas ; dispersed before 1805. PADOWAGAS, by some the Senecas were so called; uncertain. PAILSH, 200 in 1820, on coast of the Pacific, N. Columbia r., beyond the Potoashs. PALACHES, a tribe found early in Florida, but long since extinct. PAMI.ICO, but 15 in 1708, about Pamlico Sound, in N. Carolina; extinct. PANCAS once on Red River, Of Winnipec L. ; afterwards joined the Omahas. PANIS, (Tonicas,) 40 villages in 1750, S. br. Missouri; 70 villages on Red r., 1755. PANNEH. See ALLAKAWEAH, 2,300 in 1805, on heads Big Horn River. PASCATAWAYS, once a considerable tribe on the Maryland side Potomac River. PASCAGOULAS 25 men in 1805, on Red r., 60 in. below Natchitoches ; from Florida. PASSAMAQUODDIE, on Schoodak r., Me., in Perry Pleasant Point, a small number. PAUNEE, 10,000 in 1820, on the Platte and Kansas; Republicans, Loupes, and Picts. PAWISTUCIENMUK, 500 in 1820; small, brave tribe, in the prairies of Missouri. PAWTUCKETS, (Nipmuks,) on Merrimac River, where Chelmsford now is; extinct. PEGANS, (Nipmuks,) 10 in 1793, in Dudley, Mass. on a reservation of 200 acres. PELLOATPALLAH, (Chopunnish,) 1,600 in 1820, on Kooskooskee r., above forks. PENOBSCOTS, (Abenakies,) 330, on an island in Penobscot r., 12 in. above Bangor. PENNAKOOKS, (Nipmuks,) along Merrimac r., where is now Concord, N. H., &c. PEORIAS, 97 in 1820, on Current River ; one of the five tribes of the Illinois. PEQUAKETS, (Abenakies,) on sources Saco River; destroyed by English in 1725. PHILLIMEES, (Seminoles,) on or near the Suane River, Florida, in 1817. PIANKASHAWS, 3,000 once, on the Wabash; in 1780, but 950; since driven west. PIANKATANK, a tribe in Virginia when first settled; unlocated. PINESHOW, (Sioux,) 150 in 1820, on the St. Peter's, 15 m. from its mouth. PISHQUITPAH, 2,600 in 1815, N. side Columbia River, at Museleshell Rapids, W. R. POTOASH, 200 in 1820, coast Pacific, N. mouth Columbia, beyond Clamoctomichs. POTTOWATOMOE, 1671, on Noquet i., L. Michigan ; 1681, at Chicago. POWHATANS, 32 tribes spread over Virginia when first discovered by the English. PUANS, the Winnebagoes were so called by the French at one period.

Indian Tribes and Nations existing in 1880. Some now Extinct?

NABEDACHES, (Caddo,) on branch Sabine, 15 m. above the Inies; 400 in 1805. NABIJOS, between N. Mexico and the Pacific ; live in stone houses, and manufacture. NANDAKOES, 120 in 1805, on Sabine, 60 m. W. of the Yattassees ; (Caddo.) NANTIKOKES, 1711, on Nantikoke River; 1755, at Wyoming; same year went west. NARCOTAR, the name by which the Sioux know themselves. NARRAGANSETS, S. side of the bay which perpetuates their name; nearly extinct. NASHUAYS, (Nipmuks,) on that river from its mouth, in Massachusetts. NATCHEZ, at Natchez ; discovered, 1701 ; chiefly destroyed by French, 1720. NATCHITOCHES, once at that place; 100 in 1804; now upon Red River. NATEOTETAINS, 200 in 1820, W. R., on a river of their name, W. of the Facullies. NATIKS, (Nipmuks,) in Massachusetts, in a town now called after them. NECHACOKE, (Wappatoo,) 100 in 1820, S. side Columbia, near Quicksand r., W. R. NEEKEETOO, 700 in 1820, on the Pacific, S. of the Columbia, beyond the Youicone. NEMALQUINNER, (Wappatoo,) 200 in 1820, N. side Wallaumut River, 3 m. up. NIANTIES, a tribe of the Narragansets, and in alliance with them, p. 131. NICARIAGAS, once about Michilimakinak ; joined Iroquois in 1723, as seventh nation NIPISSINS, (original Algonkins,) 400 in 1764, near the source of Ottoway River. NIPMUICS, eastern interior of Mass. ; 1,500 in 1775 ; extinct. See p. 82, 104, 164, 276. NORRIDGEWOKS, (Abenakies,) on Penobscot River. See Book iii. 303, 311. NOTTOWAYS, on Nottoway River, in Virginia; but 2 of clear blood in 1817. NYACKS, (Mohicans,) or MANHATTANS, once about the Narrows, in New York.OAKMULGES, (Muskogees,) to the E. of Flint River; about 200 in 1834. OCAMECHES, in Virginia in 1607; had before been powerful; then reduced. OCHEES. See UCHEES. - Perhaps Ochesos; 230 in Florida in 1826, at Ochee Bluff OCONAS, (Creeks.) See Book iv. 369. OJIBWAS, (Chippeways,) 30,000 in 1836, about the great lakes, and N. of them. OKATIOKINANS, (Seminoles,) 580 in 1820, near Fort Gaines, E. side Mississippi. OMAHAS, 2,200 in 1820, on Elkhorn River, 80 m. front Council Bluffs. ONEIDAS, one of the Five Nations ; chief seat near Oneida Lake, New York. ONONDAGAS, one of the Five Nations; formerly in New York; 300 in 1840. OOTLASHOOTS, (Tushepahas,) 400 in 1820, on Clark's River, W. Rocky Mountains. OSAOES, 4,000 in 1830, about Arkansas and Osage Rivers; many tribes. OTAGAMIES, (Winnebagoes,) 300 in 1780, betw. Lake of the Woods and the Mississ. OTOES, 1,500 in 1820; in 1805, 500; 15 leagues up the River Platte, on S. side. OTTAWAS, 1670, removed from L. Superior to Michilimakinak ; 2,800 in 1820. OUIATANONS, or WAAS, (Kikapoos,) mouth of Eel r., Ind., 1791, in a village 3 m. long OUMAS, E. bank Mississippi in 1722, in 2 villages, quarter of a mile front the river. OWASSISSAS, (Seminoles,) 100 in 1820, on E. waters of St. Mark's River. OWAS, 2,000 in 1750; on Ozaw River in 1780, which flows into the Mississippi. OZIMIES, one of the six tribes on E. shore of Maryland and Virginia in 1607.PACANAS, on Quelquechose River, La. ; 30 men in 1805 ; 40 m. S. W. Natchitoches. PADOUCAS, 2,000 warriors in 1721, on the Kansas ; dispersed before 1805. PADOWAGAS, by some the Senecas were so called; uncertain. PAILSH, 200 in 1820, on coast of the Pacific, N. Columbia r., beyond the Potoashs. PALACHES, a tribe found early in Florida, but long since extinct. PAMI.ICO, but 15 in 1708, about Pamlico Sound, in N. Carolina; extinct. PANCAS once on Red River, Of Winnipec L. ; afterwards joined the Omahas. PANIS, (Tonicas,) 40 villages in 1750, S. br. Missouri; 70 villages on Red r., 1755. PANNEH. See ALLAKAWEAH, 2,300 in 1805, on heads Big Horn River. PASCATAWAYS, once a considerable tribe on the Maryland side Potomac River. PASCAGOULAS 25 men in 1805, on Red r., 60 in. below Natchitoches ; from Florida. PASSAMAQUODDIE, on Schoodak r., Me., in Perry Pleasant Point, a small number. PAUNEE, 10,000 in 1820, on the Platte and Kansas; Republicans, Loupes, and Picts. PAWISTUCIENMUK, 500 in 1820; small, brave tribe, in the prairies of Missouri. PAWTUCKETS, (Nipmuks,) on Merrimac River, where Chelmsford now is; extinct. PEGANS, (Nipmuks,) 10 in 1793, in Dudley, Mass. on a reservation of 200 acres. PELLOATPALLAH, (Chopunnish,) 1,600 in 1820, on Kooskooskee r., above forks. PENOBSCOTS, (Abenakies,) 330, on an island in Penobscot r., 12 in. above Bangor. PENNAKOOKS, (Nipmuks,) along Merrimac r., where is now Concord, N. H., &c. PEORIAS, 97 in 1820, on Current River ; one of the five tribes of the Illinois. PEQUAKETS, (Abenakies,) on sources Saco River; destroyed by English in 1725. PHILLIMEES, (Seminoles,) on or near the Suane River, Florida, in 1817. PIANKASHAWS, 3,000 once, on the Wabash; in 1780, but 950; since driven west. PIANKATANK, a tribe in Virginia when first settled; unlocated. PINESHOW, (Sioux,) 150 in 1820, on the St. Peter's, 15 m. from its mouth. PISHQUITPAH, 2,600 in 1815, N. side Columbia River, at Museleshell Rapids, W. R. POTOASH, 200 in 1820, coast Pacific, N. mouth Columbia, beyond Clamoctomichs. POTTOWATOMOE, 1671, on Noquet i., L. Michigan ; 1681, at Chicago. POWHATANS, 32 tribes spread over Virginia when first discovered by the English. PUANS, the Winnebagoes were so called by the French at one period.

 

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Nacisi Tribe Fact Sheet

Brief Summary:

The Nacisi tribe were a small tribe, possibly of Caddoan stock, formerly dwelling in the region of Red River, Louisiana. They were first mentioned by Joutel in 1687, at which time they were at odds with the Cenis (Caddo confederacy). When Bienville and St Denis were exploring the Red River of Louisiana in 1700, they found a village of the Nacisi consisting of 8 houses along the river. They were still in this neighborhood in 1741, but during the 18th century, the Nacisi seem to have drifted southward beyond the border of the French province. From 1790 they are mentioned among the tribes under the jurisdiction of Nacogdoches, in Texas.

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Pensacola Indians

The Pensacola Indians were a Native American people who lived in the western part of what is now the Florida Panhandle and eastern Alabama for centuries before first contact with Europeans until early in the 18th century. They spoke a Muskogean language. They are the source of the name of Pensacola Bay and the city of Pensacola. They lived in the area until the mid-18th century, but were thereafter assimilated into other groups.

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