Southwest Indian Symbols

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Southwest Indian Symbols… KEYWORDS: southwest indian symbols of indigenous peoples american indian symbol hopi symbol navajo symbol sacred symbols mother earth symbol kokopelli flute player symbol Hopi nakwách symbol of brotherhood friendship symbol fertility symbol sign of the Elder War God Hopi God of Death Maasaw connected circles keptevipi Tapu’a Mother Earth symbol of spiritual rebirth House of Teuhu

Here is a brief explanation of some Southwest Indian symbols.

height=70 alt=”” src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/brotherhood_symbol.gif” width=72 border=0 align=”left”> src=”water_symbol.gif” width=50 border=0 align=”right”>The two
figures shown here are forms of the Hopi
color=#ff0000 size=2>nakwách
color=#000000 size=2> symbol of brotherhood made when two priests clasp hands
during the Wuwuchim
dance – the dance of the linked finger. The Ute also carried
the same type friendship symbol. The design is also a sign for
water.

 

src=”Kokopelli.gif” width=50 border=0 align=”right”>The
size=2>kokopelli
, mahu or humpback flute player is found carved on stones
from South America to Canada. Koko means wood; pilau
means hump. His hump carried seeds and rainbows. In his
flute he carried music of warmth and love. His large
penis is a symbol of fertility and abundance.

 

src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/dancer_symbol.gif” width=82 border=0 align=”left”>The
dancer is reminiscent of
kokopelli without the flute and humpback or special powers to bring
rain and create abundance. Stories of the dancer vary but is
said the he lured the young away from their homes and made them
slaves.

 

src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/hand_print_symbol.gif” width=74 border=0 align=”right”>The
size=2>handprint
was a signature of the
maker of a symbol and a prayer to the Spirits to bring about the
object that was drawn such as clouds for rain. The handprint
had supernatural importance. The red hand print was a sign of
the Elder War God. The left hand, considered more sacred than
the food hand was placed on objects of religious meaning.

 

src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/Hopi_God_of_Death.gif” width=72 border=0 align=”left”> height=70 src=”Maasaw_track_of_death.gif” width=75 border=0 align=”right”>Figures of
the Hopi
God of
Death, Maasaw
and the track of Maasaw
(left) are used in modern times to mark graves to keep young people
from destroying it. “Look in the valleys, the rocks and the
woods you will find my footsteps there,” said Masau. And,
there are….

 

src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/keptevipi_symbol.gif” width=70 border=0 align=”left”>The connected
circles are similar to the
size=2>keptevipi
size=2>, a religious tool used by the Niman (Hopi) to purify the
earth. Also thought to be the eyes of the guardian of the gila
monster, an insect with four eyes. It is the Mayan
symbol for the day Ahua and the planet Venus – the morning
star.

 

src=”https://www.aaanativearts.com/wp-content/uploads/2004/11/mother_earth_symbol.gif” width=68 border=0 align=”left”> height=70 src=”hopi_tapua_symbol.gif” width=86 border=0 align=”right”>There are two
forms to the Hopi
size=2>Tapu’a
,

Mother Earth symbol, square and round representing spiritual
rebirth. The passages in the maze represent the Creator’s universal
plan man must follow. The Pimas call it the House of
size=2>Teuhu

(Gopher).