Native American inspired arts and crafts, craft supplies, jewelry & beadwork gifts
 Categories
 Articles more
All Articles
Artist Profiles A-Z
Musician Profiles A-Z
 Affiliate Program
Affiliate Information
Affiliate Login
 Specials more
Rainbow Natural Stone Ring
Rainbow Natural Stone Ring
 14.99 9.99 
 Reviews more
Write ReviewWrite a review on this product!
 Bestsellers
 SKU# 2959  Stamped Copper Bracelet
Stamped Copper Bracelet  12.95  5.00 
Stock No. AAA-CBR3CopperBracelet

This stamped copper bracelet is approximately 1/2 inch wide by 2 3/4 inches. It can be adjusted some by slowing bending or stretching it a bit.

This copper bracelet can be shipped internationally.

The "Copper" was used by the First Nations people as a form of money and wealth. It was made out of native copper which was found in the land where they lived, and superficially resembled a shield. Considered very rare and hard to obtain, raw copper was traded from the Athabaskan Indians in the Interior Plains, or from the white man in later times.

Coppers were beaten into shape and usually painted or engraved with traditional designs. Most Coppers were fairly large, often 2 to 3 feet tall and a foot across.

One of the most interesting aspects of the Copper is that they were given names so that their worth and heritage could be passed on. A Copper was only worth what it was last traded for, and it could only be traded for a larger amount the next time around. Consequently, some Coppers became highly valuable - worth the total of 1,500 to 2,000 blankets, a couple of war canoes and hundreds of boxes and bowls.

No matter what the original value was the next person who wanted it had to trade more in exchange for it. Only the richest and most powerful could afford the price of an old Copper. Many Coppers were in rather shabby condition as a result of having been used in quarrels between Chiefs.

To the Kwakiutl, the ownership and display of a Copper became an essential for the proper conduct of a marriage or important dance ritual.

A man whose family's honour had been injured by the actions of remarks of another would publicly have a piece cut from a valuable Copper and give the piece to the offender. That person was obligated to cut or "break" a Copper in return. The broken pieces could be bought up and joined into a new Copper or used to replace pieces missing from a "broken" one.

The most valuable Kwakiutl Coppers tend to be rough and patched since they have the longest history and have been broken the most often. Coppers that have been broken have a certain prestige value that is quite independent from their monetary value.

This item is not Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian, or Indian tribe, or Indian arts and crafts organization.

*

This stamped copper bracelet is approximately 1/2 inch wide by 2 3/4 inches. It can be adjusted some by slowing bending or stretching it a bit.

This copper bracelet can be shipped internationally.

The "Copper" was used by the First Nations people as a form of money and wealth. It was made out of native copper which was found in the land where they lived, and superficially resembled a shield. Considered very rare and hard to obtain, raw copper was traded from the Athabaskan Indians in the Interior Plains, or from the white man in later times.

Coppers were beaten into shape and usually painted or engraved with traditional designs. Most Coppers were fairly large, often 2 to 3 feet tall and a foot across.

One of the most interesting aspects of the Copper is that they were given names so that their worth and heritage could be passed on. A Copper was only worth what it was last traded for, and it could only be traded for a larger amount the next time around. Consequently, some Coppers became highly valuable - worth the total of 1,500 to 2,000 blankets, a couple of war canoes and hundreds of boxes and bowls.

No matter what the original value was the next person who wanted it had to trade more in exchange for it. Only the richest and most powerful could afford the price of an old Copper. Many Coppers were in rather shabby condition as a result of having been used in quarrels between Chiefs.

To the Kwakiutl, the ownership and display of a Copper became an essential for the proper conduct of a marriage or important dance ritual.

A man whose family's honour had been injured by the actions of remarks of another would publicly have a piece cut from a valuable Copper and give the piece to the offender. That person was obligated to cut or "break" a Copper in return. The broken pieces could be bought up and joined into a new Copper or used to replace pieces missing from a "broken" one.

The most valuable Kwakiutl Coppers tend to be rough and patched since they have the longest history and have been broken the most often. Coppers that have been broken have a certain prestige value that is quite independent from their monetary value.

This item is not Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian, or Indian tribe, or Indian arts and crafts organization.

*

Write Review Ask a question about this product
1
1
Write Review
Ask a question about this product
This product was added to our catalog on 10/29/2008.  
 Sign in
E-mail address:

Password:

Password forgotten
Create an Account
 My Wish List more
0 items
 Shopping Cart more
0 items
 Your Satisfaction



With PayPal you can pay by Credit Card, Bank Account, or PayPal Balance. You don't need a PayPal account to pay with a credit card.
Official PayPal Seal
(Note: Payment with an eCheck
will delay your order until the check clears our bank.)
Subscribe to our newsletter to receive discounts that are only for our subscribers!


Your order information is securely protected on this website with 256-bit Secure Sockets Layer encryption (SSL). SSL protects information from outside viewing as it flows both to and from the certificate holder's website.


aaanativearts.com Webutation
Better Business Bureau RatingBetter Business Bureau
Rating


 Quick Find more
 

Advanced Search

View All Items
 Sign in
E-mail address:

Password:

Password forgotten
Create an Account
 My Wish List more
0 items
 What's New? more
Black & Gold Metallic Tipped Turkey Quills, Pkg of 2
Black & Gold Metallic Tipped Turkey Quills, Pkg of 2
 From 1.50 
 Manufacturer Info
Other products
Shop for Native American inspired arts and crafts, craft supplies, jewelry & beadwork gifts.
Shipping & Returns || Affiliates || Privacy Policy || Printable Catalog
  Sunday 05 December, 2021
62851829 requests since Monday 01 January, 2007  
All content and Images Copyright © 2021 AAA Native Arts Gallery P. O. Box 203, Oroville, WA 98844