How many Apache sub-tribes were there and where were they located?

Apache Tribes Map

QUESTION:

How many Apache sub-tribes were there and where were they located?

~Submitted by Mindy D.

ANSWER:

The original homelands of the Apache Indians were in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, western Oklahoma, Western Texas, and Northern Mexico. The Jicarilla also ranged into what is now Kansas. The Apache tribe consists of six subtribes: the Western Apache, Chiricahua, Mescalero, Jicarilla, Lipan and Kiowa. Each subtribe is from a different geographial region.

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What percentage Indian do you have to be in order to be a member of a Tribe or Indian Nation?

Question:

What percentage Indian do you have to be in order to be a member of a Tribe or Indian Nation?

~Submitted by Sonny S.

Answer:

Every tribe has its own membership criteria; some go on blood quantum, others on descent, but whatever the criteria for “percentage Indian” it is the tribe’s enrollment office that has final say on whether a person may be a member. Anyone can claim Indian heritage, but only the tribe can grant official membership.

Tribal Nations are the only recognized arbiter of belonging to or being a member of a tribe. No other agency or arm of any government has that responsibility, other than the particular tribe to which a person claims to belong.

Here is a list of some tribes that claim blood quantum / percentage Indian requirements:

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Native women who served in the U.S. Military

In honor of their contributions, here are some Notable Native American Women Veterans that certainly deserve to be recognized. It also goes without saying, that all of our nations veterans and servicemembers are always on our list of heroes, whether or not they appear on this list.

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Wappo Indians

The Wappo language constituted a very divergent form of speech of the Yukian linguistic family.

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Luiseño Indians

The Luiseño language belongs to the Cupan group of Takic languages, within the major Uto-Aztecan family of languages. About 30 to 40 people speak the language.

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Lassik Indians

The Lassik belonged to the Athapascan linguistic family and were connected very closely with the Nongatl, who lay just to the north.

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Kamia Indians (Kumeyaay)

The Kamia Indians belonged to the Yuman stock of Powell now considered a subdivision of the Hokan family, their closest affinities being with the eastern Diegueno who were sometimes considered one tribe with themselves. Today, they prefer to be called Kumeyaay.

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Modoc Indians

The Modoc Indian territory extended into the northern part of California. With the Klamath, the Modoc constituted the Lutuamian division of the Shapwailutan linguistic stock of the Penutian language family.

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Nicoleño Indians

The Nicoleño were a Uto-Aztecan Native American tribe who lived on San Nicolas Island, California.

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Hupa Indians

The Hupa belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock, forming one closely knit linguistic group with the Chilula and Whilkut.

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Yokuts Indians

—The Yokuts Indians were originally considered a distinct linguistic family but have now been made a part of the large Penutian stock.

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Yurok Indians

Yurok is an Algonquian language. The Yurok Tribe is California’s largest Indian Tribe with nearly 5,000 enrolled members. The Yurok Indians are also known historically as the Pohlik-la, Ner-er-er, Petch-ik-lah and Klamath River Indians.

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Tipai-Ipai Tribe (Kumeyaay)

Diegueno is a member language of the Yuman division of the Hokan language family. Tipai-Ipai is the common name since the 1950s of two linguistically related groups formerly known as Kamia (Kumeyaay) and Diegueno. Today, they once again prefer the term Kumeyaay.

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Patwin Indians

The Patwin formed the southernmost and most diverse dialetic division of the former Wintun (or Copehan) linguistic family, now considered part of the Penutian stock.

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Serrano Indians

The Serrano belonged to the Shoshonean Division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock.

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Wailaki

With the Mattole, Lassik, Sinkyone, and Nongatl, the Wailaki spoke a Southern Athapaskan language.

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Shasta Indians

The Shasta Indians were one of four Shastan tribes, the other three being Konomihu, Okwanuchu, and New River Shasta. The Shasta Indians constituted part of the Shastan division of the Hokan linguistic stock.

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Pomo Indians

The Pomo were originally placed in a distinct linguistic stock (Kulanapan) but are now attached to the widely scattered Hokan family.

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Miwok Indians

Originally a distinct stock in the classificatory system of Powell, Miwok has now been made a subdivision of the Penutian linguistic family.

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Wailaki Indians

The Wailaki Indians belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock and to the southern California group.

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Wintu Indians

The Wintu Indians were the northernmost division of the Copehan stock of Powell, later called Wintun by Kroeber (1932) and now regarded as part of the Penutian family.

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Yuki Indians

The Coast Yuki Indians believe themselves to be an offshoot from the Huchnom but linguistic examination seems to place them near the Yuki.

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Chumash Indians

At first considered a distinct linguistic stock, the Chumash are now included in the larger Hokan family.

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Tubatulabal Indians of California

The Tubatulabal Indians originally lived in three autonomous bands: the Pahkanapil, Palagewan, and Bankalachi, or Toloim. Tubatulabal was a subgroup of the Uto-Aztecan language family.

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Vanyume Indians

The Vanyume Indians belonged to the Shoshonean Division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock. Their closest connections being probably with the Kitanemuk, and secondly with the Serrano.

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Salinan Indians

Formerly considered a distinct linguistic stock, the Salinan Indians are now connected with the Hokan linguistic family.

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Gabrielino Indians

The nearest connections of the Gabrielino were the Fernandeno; both belonged to the California branch of the Shoshonean Division of the Uto-Aztecan stock.

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Yahi Indians

The Yahi Indians constituted the southernmost group of the Yanan division of the Hokan linguistic stock.

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Cahuilla Indians

The Cahuilla belonged to the southern California group of the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan stock.

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Fernandeno Indians

Seal of the Fernandeno Mission Indians

The nearest relatives of the Fernandeno were the Gabrielino and both belonged to the California section of the Shoshonean Division of the Uto Aztecan linguistic stock.

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Atsugewi Indians

With the Achomawi, the Atsugewi constituted the Palaihnihan or eastern group of the Shastan stock, more recently placed by Dixon and Kroeber (1919) in the Hokan family.

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Tolowa Indians

The Tolowa Indians constituted one of the divisions into which the California peoples of the Athapascan linguistic stock are divided, but they were closely connected with the Athapascan tribes of Oregon immediately to the north.

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Huchnom Indians

The Huchnom belonged to the Yukian linguistic stock, though resembling the Porno somewhat more closely in culture.

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Halchidhoma Indians

The Halchidhoma belonged to the Yuman branch of the Hokan linguistic stock and are said to have spoken the same language as the Yuma tribe and to have been closely connected also with the Maricopa.

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Maidu Indians

Formerly considered an independent stock, the Maidu have now been placed in the Penutian linguistic family.

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Whilkut Indians

The Whilkut Indians belonged to the Hupa dialectic group of the Athapascan linguistic family.

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Konomihu Indians

The Konomihu was the most divergent of the Shastan group of tribes of the Hokan linguistic family.

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Chemehuevi Indians

The Chemehuevi were a part of the true Paiute and were associated with them and the Ute in one linguistic subdivision of the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock.

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Yuma Indians

The Yuma were one of the chief tribes of the old Yuman linguistic stock, to which they have given their name, but their closest immediate relatives were the Maricopa and Halchidhoma. The Yuman stock is now considered a part of the larger Hokan family.

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Chilula Indians

With the Hupa and Whilkut, the Chilula formed one group of the Athapascan linguistic stock.

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Kitanemuk Indians

The Kitanemuk belonged to the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock and to a subgroup which included also the Alliklik, Vanyume and Serrano.

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Esselen Indians

Originally given the status of a distinct stock, the Esselen are now placed in the Hokan linguistic family, their affinities being rather with the Yuman division, to the south, and with the Porno, Yana, and other groups to the north than with their closer neighbors of this stock, the Salinan and Chumash tribes.

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Mattole Indians

The Mattole constitute one of the primary divisions of those Indians of the Athapascan stock living in California.

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Sinkyone Indians

The Sinkyone Indians were one of the tribes of the southern California group of the Athapascan family.

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Nongatl Indians

The Nongatl belonged to the Athapascan linguistic family and were closely connected with the Lassik.

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Yana Indians

In the early nineteenth century, the Yana lived in the upper Sacramento River Valley and the adjacent eastern foothills. The elevation of their territory ranged between 300 and 10,000 feet. The Yana Indians were originally considered an independent linguistic stock but are now placed in the larger Hokan family. Its four divisions were Northern, Central, Southern, and Yahi.

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Wintun Indians

The Wintun were formerly considered a part of Powell’s Copehan stock and the Wintun of Kroeber (1932) but are now placed in the Penutian family. Synonym for Wintu.

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Dakubetede Indians

The Dakubetede were an Athapascan tribe of Oregon which extended slightly beyond the northern border of California. The Dakubetede belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock, using a dialect identical with that of the Taltushtuntude.

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Okwanuchu Indians

The Okwanuchu belonged to the Shastan Division of the Hokan linguistic stock.

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Karok Indians

Originally considered an independent stock, the Karok are now classed in a much larger linguistic connection known as the Hokan family. Their closest relatives are the Chimariko and Shasta.

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Alliklik Indians

The Alliklik belonged to the Californian group of the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, their closest relatives probably being the Serrano.

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Juaneño Indians

The Juaneño belonged to the Shoshonean branch of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, their speech being a variant of Luiseno.

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Koso Indians

The Koso formed the westernmost extension of the Shoshoni-Comanche branch of the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock.

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Chimariko Indians

Originally considered a distinct stock, the Chimariko are now classed in the Hokan linguistic family.

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Mohave Indians

The Mohave occupied some territory in the neighborhood of the Colorado River. The Mohave belong to the Yuman linguistic family.

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Eagle and Crow created the world

Yokut Creation Story

A Great Flood had occurred upon Earth long, long ago. While Earth was still covered with water, there were no living creatures upon the land.

Then out of the sky one day glided an enormous Eagle with a black Crow riding upon its back, searching for a place to light.

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Northern Paiute Indians

The Northern Paiute occupied part of the Sierra in the southeastern part of California and the desert country east of it and also a strip of land in the extreme northeast. They spoke a Uto-Aztecan language from the Western Numic branch.

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Cupeño Indians

The Cupeno spoke a dialect belonging to the Luiseno-Cahuilla branch of the Shoshonean division of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock.

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Wiyot Indians

Wiyot is the name of one of three culturally and linguistically related groups on the Eel River Delta in the early nineteenth century. They were culturally similar to the Yurok.

In the Powellian classification the Wiyot Indians were given an independent position as the Wishoskan stock.

Later California investigators combined them with the Yurok under the name Ritwan but still later believed that they had established a relationship between them and the great Algonquian family of the east. This allocation is, however, questioned by other ethnologists.

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Achomawi Indians

The Achomawi Indians were originally classed with the Atsugewi as one stock under the name Palaihnihan, the Achomawan stock of Merriam (1926), and this in turn constitutes the eastern branch of the Shastan stock, which in turn is now placed under the widely spread Hokan family.

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Kato Indians

The Kato Indians belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock, and spoke a dialect peculiar to themselves.

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Bear River Indians

The Bear River Indians belonged to the Athapascan linguistic family, and were most closely connected with the Mattole, Sinkyone, and Nongatl tribes to the south and east.

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Kawaiisu Indians

The Kawaiisu belonged to the Shoshonean branch of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic family, and were a more immediate off-shoot, apparently, of the Chemehuevi.

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