Pensacola Indians

The Pensacola Indians were a Native American people who lived in the western part of what is now the Florida Panhandle and eastern Alabama for centuries before first contact with Europeans until early in the 18th century. They spoke a Muskogean language. They are the source of the name of Pensacola Bay and the city of Pensacola. They lived in the area until the mid-18th century, but were thereafter assimilated into other groups.

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The Little Brother of War, Choctaw Stickball

Stick Ball games were part of the culture of many tribes, and were not only an important spiritual aspect in ceremonies, but were also used to settle disputes without having a full out war. In this 16 minute video, learn how stickball games were played, the part they played in the Choctaw tribal culture, the rules of the game, and how the equipment was made.

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Ignorant stuff non-indians say to indians (presented in a funny way)

Ignorant stuff non-indians say to indians (presented in a funny way). Aye!

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Red Tomahawk, Sitting Bull’s Assassin

Red Tomahawk, Sitting Bull’s assassin, lived in a time of rapid change for the Lakota-Dakota people. He did the only thing that he believed he could, serve as a B.I.A. police officer and put his warrior days behind him. He is most often remembered for killing Sitting Bull. Here’s his story.

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Cheyenne River Indian Reservation

The Cheyenne River Indian Reservation (CRIR) covers almost all of Dewey and Ziebach counties in South Dakota. In addition, there are many small parcels of off-reservation trust land are located in Stanley, Haakon, and Meade counties.

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Biloxi-Chitimacha Confederation of Muskogee

The Biloxi-Chitimacha Confederation of Muskogee were recognized as a tribe by the state of Louisiana in 2005. They previously split off from the United Houma Nation, Inc., and applied for Federal Recognition in 2008. Their application is still waiting for review.

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Interior Secretary approves Nooksack tribal disenrollment process

The Department of the Interior has potentially cleared the way for the Nooksack Indian Tribe to strip 306 people of their tribal membership over the telephone. In the most recent step of a process that the tribal council started two years ago, the Secretary of the Interior has ruled that a September 2014 tribal ordinance detailing a disenrollment process is legal under the tribe’s constitution.

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Seminole Men Visit the Sky

Near the beginning of time, five Seminole Indian men wanted to visit the sky to see the Great Spirit.They travelled to the East, walking for about a month. Finally, they arrived at land’s end. They tossed their baggage over the end and they, too, disappeared beyond earth’s edge. Continue reading

Makah Creation Legend

The Makah Indians, who live on the farthest point of the northwest corner of Washington State, used to tell stories not about one Changer, but about the Two-Men-Who-Changed-Things. So did their close relatives, who lived on Vancouver Island, across the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Continue reading

Makah Creation Legend

The Makah Indians, who live on the farthest point of the northwest corner of Washington State, used to tell stories not about one Changer, but about the Two-Men-Who-Changed-Things. So did their close relatives, who lived on Vancouver Island, across the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Continue reading

Spider Rock, a Navajo legend

Spider Rock stands with awesome dignity and beauty over 800 feet high in Arizona’s colourful Canyon de Chelly National Park (pronounced da Shay). Geologists of the National Park Service say that “the formation began 230 million years ago. Continue reading

Apache Creation Story

Animals, elements, the solar system, and natural phenomena are revered by the Apaches. That which is beyond their understanding is always ascribed to the supernatural. Here is their creation story. Continue reading

Apache Creation Story

Animals, elements, the solar system, and natural phenomena are revered by the Apaches. That which is beyond their understanding is always ascribed to the supernatural. Here is their creation story. Continue reading

The Mandan Buffalo Dance

The most exciting event of the year was the festival of the Buffalo Dance. Eight men participated, wearing buffalo skins on their backs and painting themselves black, red, and white. Dancers endeavoured to imitate the buffalo on the prairie. Continue reading

Yellowstone Valley and the Great Flood

I have heard it told on the Cheyenne Reservation in Montana and the Seminole camps in the Florida Everglades, I have heard it from the Eskimos north of the Arctic Circle and the Indians south of the equator. The legend of the flood is the most universal of all legends. It is told in Asia, Africa, and Europe, in North America and the South Pacific. This is one of fifteen native American legends that tell about the great flood.

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MicMac Creation Story

This story has been passed down from generation to generation since time immemorial and it explains how Mik’Maq people came into existence in North America. The story tells about the relationship between the Great Spirit Creator and Human Beings and the Environment. Continue reading

MicMac Creation Story

This story has been passed down from generation to generation since time immemorial and it explains how Mik’Maq people came into existence in North America. The story tells about the relationship between the Great Spirit Creator and Human Beings and the Environment. Continue reading

Legend of Wountie

A long time ago, even before the time of the flood, the Cheakamus River provided food for the Squamish people. Each year, at the end of summer, when the salmon came home to spawn, the people would cast their cedar root nets into the water and get enough fish for the winter to come.

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The Bear’s Child

In the Old Times, there once lived a boy called Sigo, whose father had died when he was a baby. Sigo was too young to hunt and provide food for the wigwam, so his mother was obliged to take another husband, a jealous spiteful man who soon came to dislike his small stepson, for he thought the mother cared more for the child than for himself. He thought of a plan to be rid of the boy. Continue reading

How Glooskap Found the Summer

Long ago a mighty race of Indians lived near the sunrise, and they called themselves Wabanaki—Children of Light. Glooskap was their master. He was kind to his people and did many great deeds for them.

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How Coyote Stole Fire

Long ago, when man was newly come into the world, there were days when he was the happiest creature of all. Those were the days when spring brushed across the willow tails, or when his children ripened with the blueberries in the sun of summer, or when the goldenrod bloomed in the autumn haze. Continue reading

Big Long Man’s Corn Patch

As soon as Big Long Man got back from the mountains he went to his garden to admire his corn and melons. He had planted a big crop for the coming winter. When he saw that half of the corn stalks had been shucked and the ears stolen, and that the biggest melons were gone off of the melon vines, he was very angry. Continue reading

Raccoon and the Bee Tree

The Raccoon had been asleep all day in the snug hollow of a tree. The dusk was coming on when he awoke, stretched himself once or twice, and jumping down from the top of the tall, dead stump in which he made his home, set out to look for his supper. Continue reading

Mashtinna, the Rabbit

Mashtinna, the Rabbit, was a handsome young man, and, moreover, of a kind disposition. One day, when he was hunting, he heard a child crying bitterly, and made all haste in the direction of the sound. Continue reading

Origin of the Buffalo Dance

When the buffalo first came to be upon the land, they were not friendly to the people. When the hunters tried to coax them over the cliffs for the good of the villages, they were reluctant to offer themselves up. They did not relish being turned into blankets and dried flesh for winter rations. Continue reading

Buffalo and the Mouse

When the Field-Mouse was out gathering wild beans for the winter, his neighbor, the Buffalo, came down to graze in the meadow. This the little Mouse did not like, for he knew that the other would mow down all the long grass with his prickly tongue, and there would be no place in which to hide. He made up his mind to offer battle like a man.

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More Than 100 Native American Tribes Consider Growing Marijuana

More than 100 Native American tribes have reached out to FoxBarry Farms, a management firm building the nation’s first marijuana facility on tribal land, to express interest in the cannabis industry.

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How the chipmunk got his stripes

Long ago when animals could talk, a bear was walking along. Now it has always been said that bears think very highly of themselves. Since they are big and strong, they are certain that they are the most important of the animals. As this bear went along turning over big logs with his paws to look for food to eat, he felt very sure of himself. “There is nothing I cannot do,” said this bear.

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