Chickasaw Clans

In earlier times, all Chickasaws belonged to a clan of his or her mother; this is known as a matrilineal system. One of the main functions of the clan was to provide kinship with clan members in other villages. Traditionally, a person would not be allowed to marry someone within his or her own clan. Continue reading

Chiwere language

Language Classification:

 Siouan -> Western Siouan -> Mississippi Valley -> Chiwere–Winnebago -> Chiwere

Continue reading

Truman Washington Dailey,last native speaker of the Otoe-Missouria dialect of Chiwere

Truman Washington Dailey, (October 19, 1898 – December 16, 1996) also known as Mashi Manyi (“Soaring High”) and Sunge Hka (“White Horse”), was the last native speaker of the Otoe-Missouria dialect of Chiwere (Baxoje-Jiwere-Nyut’chi), a Native American language, and a Roadman in the Native American church.

Continue reading

Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder’s foundation offers to build skate park on Fort Yuma Quechan Reservation

The Fort Yuma Quechan (Kwatsan) Tribe listened to an offer Wednesday from Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder’s foundation to build a memorial skate park on its reservation with “no strings attached.”

Continue reading

Cattails are the perfect survival food, tool, shelter and medicine

Picture of cattails

Cattails can be found virtually anywhere in the wilderness where there is a water source and are a supermarket full of food and uses that can help ensure your survival.

Continue reading

Oorang Indians, NFL’s Most Colorful Franchise

If you were to drive down dusty State Route 37 in Ohio, past grain elevators and feed stores, to a broken sidewalk in the town of LaRue, you would find one of those blue steel historical markers that rise from obscure landscapes around America. This one says: Home of the Oorang Indians, NFL’s Most Colorful Franchise

Continue reading

Camas Lily was a staple food of many native tribes

Camas Lily field

The Camas lily was used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes and its root bulbs were collected to make bread, or roasted like a potato.

Continue reading

Native American Day One Step Closer as an Official State Holiday in California

Assembly member Roger Hernández (D – West Covina) announced Assembly Bill 1973 passed the Senate Governmental Organization Committee on a 10-0 bi-partisan vote. AB 1973 elevates the recognition of Native American Day from a proclamation to an official state holiday, recognized annually on the fourth Friday of September.

Continue reading

Cherokee Nation to offer tribal photo IDs in Colorado

Nearly 3,500 Cherokee citizens living in Colorado will have a chance to obtain tribal citizenship photo IDs, according to tribal officials, who will give information at community meeting in Denver on July 19.

Continue reading

Nooksack Place Names

The names remembered and recorded for places in the original Nooksack language, Lhéchalosem, tie the modern Nooksack Indian people to their traditional lands.

Continue reading

Cheyenne Warrior Societies

Soldier societies provided martial training, socialization, and preservation of tradition among the men who joined the groups.

Continue reading

Cheyenne Principal Divisions and Bands

The Cheyenne Nation or Tsêhéstáno was at one time composed of ten bands which spread across the Great Plains from southern Colorado to the Black Hills in South Dakota

Continue reading

Algonquian Bands and Clans

The Algonquian Family  adapted its name from the Algonkin tribe. This is a linguistic stock which formerly occupied a more extended area than any other language in North America . Their territory reached from the Eastern shore of Newfoundland to the Rocky Mountains.

Continue reading

What is an Indian Colony?

An Indian Colony is a Native American settlement associated with an urban area.

Continue reading

European Explorers and US Government Timeline 1492-1999

This is a timeline of European explorer’s interaction with north American indian tribes beginning with Columbus’ voyages in 1492, along with US Government actions taken in the 19th and  20th century. Continue reading

Mayan Spiritual Mythology

Here is a list, hopefully reasonably complete, of known Mayan God-forms. The information here is necessarily brief; a full accounting of all these entities would be a massive book in its own right. Continue reading

Haudenosaunee Spiritual Mythology

These Haudenosaunee spiritual concepts are intended as a general reference guide for students of Eastern Woodland mythology. The format will consist of a Name (and occasionally a translation in the Seneca or Seneca-Mingo dialects) with a description of the divinity.

Continue reading

Lakota Spiritual Mythology

These Lakota spiritual concepts are intended as a general reference guide for students of Plains Indian mythology. The format will consist of a Name (and occasionally a translation) with a description of the divinity.

Continue reading

Catawba Timeline

The Catawba tribe traditionally lived aAlong the banks of the Catawba River in North and South Carolina. Today, they have a 640-acre reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina. This tribe was federally recognized in 1993. Here is a timeline of important events in their history.

Continue reading

Navajo Teen Turns Community Need Into Solar Oven

Growing up and watching her community on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico go without got 16-year-old Raquel Redshirt thinking. “My great grandparents barely used their stove because they couldn’t afford to buy propane,” Raquel says in the video. So, to solve this problem she used materials around the Navajo Nation to build solar ovens using something the Navajo Nation has plenty of, sun.

Continue reading