Oglala Sioux tribe moves to seize Wounded Knee land through eminent domain

RAPID CITY- When James Czywczynski first announced that he was selling the two forty acre tracts of land, one at Wounded Knee and one at Porcupine Butte, for a total of $4.9 million, many people scoffed at the notion that someone would be willing to pay that much for the land.

Nonetheless as the months have passed and several potential buyers are now negotiating a final deal on the land the Oglala Sioux Tribe has decided to take action and file in federal court under the premise of eminent domain to seize the land.

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Have you got what it takes to make a native american documentary?

Vision Maker Media is a Native organization that is heavily funded by Public Broadcasting. The group is always looking for provocative and engaging completed films from independent or public television producers. Their goal is to encourage works that address new and current issues reflecting the changing nature of Native American communities.

“We’re particularly interested in programs such as Native American Graduates, Women and Girls who Lead, and Veterans’ Issues,” said Shirley K. Sneve (Sicangu), Vision Maker Media’s executive director.

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Crow tribe asserts hunting and other treaty rights granted by the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868

The Crow tribal government has asserted tribal rights on key issues that include off-reservation hunting and road access to the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

Crow Chairman Darrin Old Coyote introduced a series of five joint resolutions that the Crow Legislature approved in a special session May 7.  Old Coyote signed them on May 14. The session was timed to coincide with the 145th anniversary of the signing of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty.

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Navajo Nation may stiffen crime penalties

SHIPROCK — Tribal officials are proposing more severe sentencing for criminals on the Navajo Nation.

The tribe’s Law and Order Committee this week is holding public hearings regarding changes that could be made to Title 17, the tribe’s criminal code that deals with sentencing on the Navajo Nation. A public hearing will be held 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday at the Shiprock chapter house.

The changes could include steeper penalties for a variety of crimes, including the possession of alcohol one of the most common offenses on the Navajo Nation.

The committee is reviewing the code because in January 2000 the tribe eliminated or lessened jail terms and fines for nearly 30 offenses. The tribe had limited resources to penalize offenders, according to the committee.

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List of Memorial Day Pow Wows and basic powwow etiquette

The rhythm of the drum signifies the heartbeat of the people. Singing and dancing are integral features of the pow wow celebration, expressions of the spirit of the people. We get together at a powwow to celebrate and to give thanks to the Creator for the good that we’ve had in the past. We say healing prayers as we dance.

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Nez Perce Bands

At one time, there were more than fifty bands of Nez Perce. The bands and divisions of the Nez Perce are now known only approximately. The following bands were known in the early 1900s:

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Spokane Tribal Council may oust vice-chairman for lying about identity in bison poaching incident

Spokane Tribal leaders are deciding whether to oust their vice chairman for lying to a game officer investigating bison poaching in Montana.

Rodney W. Abrahamson was convicted of five misdemeanors after he illegally killed two bison north of Yellowstone National Park in February, while traveling with a group of Nez Perce hunters who were on a legal hunt. The court record states he lied to Montana wildlife agents about his identity. He claimed to be Nez Perce, the tribe that has rights to hunt bison. The Spokane tribe does not have treaty rights to hunt the animal.

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Great Basin Region Timeline

12,000-9,000 B.C.  Sites have been found indicating Paleo-Indian habitation within the Great Basin. They were small hunting groups following the mammoth, bison, camel and horse herds. 

9,000 B.C – 400 A.D.  Implements found in this area from this “Great Basin Desert Archaic Period” include milling stones.

3,000 B.C.  The lives of the oldest bristlecone pine trees in the Great Basin National Park began.

500-800 A.D.  The Fremont Culture emerged, leaving behind well-preserved sites indicating agricultural activity as well as hunting and gathering.

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Enrollment Requirements of the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation

Enrollment requirements of the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation requires members to live on the reservation at least one year out of three and also requires a blood quantum of at least 1/4 Paiute or Shoshone ancestry.

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Enrollment Requirements of the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation

Enrollment requirements of the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation requires members to live on the reservation at least one year out of three and also requires a blood quantum of at least 1/4 Paiute or Shoshone ancestry.

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