TV Slur Revives Debate About Sacheen Littlefeather and Her Role in Marlon Brando’s Oscar Refusal

History was made in 1973 when Marlon Brando declined to accept the best actor Oscar for his role in The Godfather to protest the treatment of American Indians. His demurral, which was delivered on stage by a young Native American activist named Sacheen Littlefeather, generated intense controversy and criticism throughout the country. Almost 40 years later, some in Hollywood still seem to hold a grudge. Continue reading

New Mexico’s pueblos have a history with the federal government unlike any other American Indian tribe.

The 19 pueblo tribes never signed treaties, and with that came decades of a dual existence. On one hand, they didn’t fit the mold the government had established for native people. Still, they were Indian enough to be subjected to policies that called for them to trade in their native languages and send their children to boarding school.

For the first time, the pueblos have come together to offer their own historical perspective on the effects of 100 years of state and federal policy as part of an exhibit at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque.

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Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Timeline

This Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa timeline covers the period from 1300 to 1997. Originally Eastern Woodland Indians, the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa migrated to the Great Plains and adopted the Plains lifestyle in the early 1800s.
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Ojibway Migration Story

The Ojibway moved from the Great Salt Lake in the east to their westward locations in the center of America. William Warren (1885) told about the migration by sharing a story that was told during a ceremony he attended. According to Warren, the spiritual leader held a Me-da-wa-me-gis, a small white shell, in his hand as he related the following:

While our forefathers were living on the great salt water toward the rising sun, the great Megis (Sea Shell) showed itself above the surface of the great water, and the rays of the sun for some long periods were reflected from its glossy back. It gave warmth and light to the An-ish-in-aub-ag (red race). Continue reading

Creation of Turtle Mountain

This Ojibway legend tells of the Great Flood and how the sacred Turtle Mountain was formed. Continue reading

Creation of Turtle Mountain

This Ojibway legend tells of the Great Flood and how the sacred Turtle Mountain was formed. Continue reading

Ojibway Creation Story

When Ah-ki’ (the Earth) was young, it was said that the Earth had a family. Like in a family, they had responsibilities both spiritually and physically. The Creator of this family is Kitchie Man-i-to’ (Great Mystery or Creator). He is like the great grandfather who has all the knowledge, wisdom and is always there…in a spiritual sense.

Nee-ba-gee’-sis (the Moon) means heavenly being that watches over us while we are sleeping in the spiritual sense, and is referred to as Grandmother because she, like in all families, watches over us while we are sleeping in a physical sense.

Gee’-sis (the Sun) means heavenly being watching us during the day. And is also referred to as Grandfather because he is the one who has the responsibility of watching over us during day. The Earth is said to be a woman and is also referred to as our mother because she gives you life, protects, and nurtures you. In this way it is understood that a woman preceded man on Earth. Continue reading

Ojibway Creation Story

When Ah-ki’ (the Earth) was young, it was said that the Earth had a family. Like in a family, they had responsibilities both spiritually and physically. The Creator of this family is Kitchie Man-i-to’ (Great Mystery or Creator). He is like the great grandfather who has all the knowledge, wisdom and is always there…in a spiritual sense.

Nee-ba-gee’-sis (the Moon) means heavenly being that watches over us while we are sleeping in the spiritual sense, and is referred to as Grandmother because she, like in all families, watches over us while we are sleeping in a physical sense.

Gee’-sis (the Sun) means heavenly being watching us during the day. And is also referred to as Grandfather because he is the one who has the responsibility of watching over us during day. The Earth is said to be a woman and is also referred to as our mother because she gives you life, protects, and nurtures you. In this way it is understood that a woman preceded man on Earth. Continue reading

‘Where I am From,’ a Poem By Turtle Mountain Seventh-Grader Trevis LaRocque

When given the assignment to write a poem in his seventh-grade English class at Turtle Mountain Community Middle School in Belcourt, North Dakota, Trevis J. LaRocque, an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, chose to write about where he was from—the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation.

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Light Warriors face vandalism charges at the Serpent Mound site

The Ohio Historical Society and Adams County Sheriff K.R. Rogers haven’t arrested anybody yet in what they consider a serious vandalism case. But the people who apparently did it made it easy by laying out their actions in an extensive YouTube video where they acknowledge they “did some work” in September at the Serpent Mound site in Adams County to help “lift the vibration of the Earth so we can all rise together.”

State officials aren’t seeing the light, however, and expect to file charges soon against three to five people who they say vandalized and desecrated the 1,000-year-old Serpent Mound site that is on the National Register of Historic Places. The perpetrators face second-degree misdemeanors, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $5,000 fine.

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From the American Revolution to Operation Enduring Freedom, native americans have served the United States with valor and honor

Throughout November, the nation will celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month. This year’s theme is “Serving Our People, Serving our Nations: Native Visions for Future Generations.”

On Nov. 11, Americans also will celebrate Veterans Day. Through these two observances, Americans can celebrate not only the significant contributions of American Indians and Alaska natives to our heritage and culture but also their contribution to this country’s defense. Continue reading

Origins of Native American Heritage Month (November)

Generally thought to be a relatively recent phenomenon created by Congress, the roots of Native American Heritage Month go back over a century. It was Native Americans, themselves, who first promoted national recognition of their heritage. The Boy Scouts of America then became their political ally. Continue reading

Russell Means, native american activist, dead at age 72

Russell C. Means, the charismatic Oglala Sioux who helped revive the warrior image of the American Indian in the 1970s with guerrilla-tactic protests that called attention to the nation’s history of injustices against its indigenous peoples, died on Monday, October 29, 2012, at his ranch in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. He was 72.

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