Seminole Tribe of Florida Overview

As the name says, the Seminole Tribe of Florida is from the state of Florida.

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Apalachee Tribe, Missing for Centuries, Comes Out of Hiding

A veteran archaeologist, Bonnie McEwan sifts dirt in search of vanished cultures. It’s not every day she hears from one in person.

Dr. McEwan directs Mission San Luis, a 17th-century site where Spanish friars baptized thousands of Apalachee, an Indian nation so imposing that early mapmakers bestowed the tribe’s name on distant mountains, known ever since as the Appalachians. In 1704, English forces attacked, driving the Apalachee into slavery and exile. Scholars long ago pronounced the tribe extinct.

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Influence of Spanish Missions on Indigenous tribes of Florida

The Spanish chapter of Georgia’s earliest colonial history is dominated by the lengthy mission era, extending from 1568 through 1684. Catholic missions were the primary means by which Georgia’s indigenous Native American chiefdoms were assimilated into the Spanish colonial system along the northern frontier of greater Spanish Florida.

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History of the Seminole Wars

The First Seminole War

Following the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain, American slave owners came to Florida in search of runaway African slaves and Indians. These Indians, known as the Seminole, and the runaway slaves had been trading weapons with the British throughout the early 1800s and supported Britain during the War of 1812. From 1817-1818, the United States Army invaded Spanish Florida and fought against the Seminole and their African American allies. Collectively, these battles came to be known as the First Seminole War.

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The Seminole Wars

The First Seminole War

Following the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain, American slave owners came to Florida in search of runaway African slaves and Indians. These Indians, known as the Seminole, and the runaway slaves had been trading weapons with the British throughout the early 1800s and supported Britain during the War of 1812. From 1817-1818, the United States Army invaded Spanish Florida and fought against the Seminole and their African American allies. Collectively, these battles came to be known as the First Seminole War.

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The Apalachees of Northwest Florida from Mission San Luis

From at least A.D. 1000, a group of farming Indians was living in northwest Florida. They were called the Apalachees. Other Florida Indians regarded them as being wealthy and fierce. Some think the Apalachee language was related to Hitchiti of the Muskhogean language family. Continue reading

Two Myths of the Mission Indians of California

AUTHOR: A. L. Kroeber What are today known as the Mission Indians are those Shoshonean and Yuman peoples who occupy the portion of southern California which lies between the principal mountain ranges and the sea. Our knowledge of the mythology … Continue reading

History of Cherokee Indians in Arkansas

There have been many very notable and honored Chiefs that lived in the Arkansas Territory. Some have claimed Dangerous Man from the Cherokee legend of the Lost Cherokee resided in Arkansas for a time, however we will stick to what we know as fact, as that is usually the best policy when doing legitimate research.

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Arkansas Cherokee Indians

There have been many very notable and honored Chiefs that lived in the Arkansas Territory. Some have claimed Dangerous Man from the Cherokee legend of the Lost Cherokee resided in Arkansas for a time, however we will stick to what we know as fact, as that is usually the best policy when doing legitimate research.

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Olmec Gods and Mystical Beliefs

The Olmec had many beliefs. Among these beliefs were chaneques which were dwarf trixters who lived in water falls. They also had their own beliefs in cosmology. The Olmec had natural shrines devoted to the hill on which the shrine was located and the water.

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United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indian enrollment requirements

The United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians was organized under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 and the Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act of 1936.

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Enrollment Requirements

The Cherokee Nation once encompassed parts of eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, western West Virginia, southwestern Virginia, western North Carolina, northern Alabama, northwestern South Carolina and northern Georgia. Genealogy issues are further complicated by the infamous removal of the Cherokee to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears in the late 1830s.

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The Sioux Name Game

Today there are 18 First Nations in Canada and 17 Tribes in the United States who are the descendants of the Ocheti Sakowin. The Ocheti Sakowin speak three main dialects, Dakota, Nakota, and Lakota, that in time have evolved into a number of sub dialects.

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Overview of the Creek Indian Tribe

The Creek Indians were a confederation of tribes that belonged primarily to the Muskhogean linguistic group, which also included the Choctaws and Chickasaws. The Muskogees were the dominant tribe of the confederacy, but all members eventually came to be known collectively as Creek Indians.

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How to become a member of the Poarch Creek Indians

At present, the Poarch Creek Indian Tribal Roll is open for membership only if the following conditions are met.

Finding your Cherokee ancestors

In 1976, Cherokee voters ratified a new Cherokee Constitution, which changed the ways of measuring tribal membership. At that time, it was determined that anyone who could trace direct descent from the Dawes Rolls, a census taken between 1902-1907, could become a registered citizen of the Cherokee Nation. There are now over 165,00 registered Cherokee citizens. Here is how to determine if you might be eligible for enrollment in a Cherokee tribe.

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Census rolls and historical records that contain clues to Cherokee genealogy

The different Census Rolls are given control numbers by the National Archives so they may be ordered, such as M-1234. The rolls are usually named for the person taking the census. Each roll pertains to a particular year so it is important to select the year that applies to the individual whom you are looking to find. I usually like to start with the Guion Miller Roll. The claims had to be on file by August 31, 1907. In 1909 Miller stated that 45,847 separate applications had been filed representing a total of about 90,000 individuals; 3436 resided east, and 27,384 were residing West of the Mississippi.

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Where to start your Cherokee genealogy research

The Cherokee Indians have had continuing dealings with the U.S. Government since the 1700’s through treaties, legislation, and the courts. There are probably more federal records concerning the Cherokees than any other tribe.

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Some Chocktaw genealogy research suggestions

In doing research on Choctaw genealogy, it is useful to combine standard genealogical research with information from federal records. The typical research of records in the county courthouse or state archives frequently leads to other information from the federal records.

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Historical records where you might find genealogical records of your Choctaw ancestry

There are extensive governmental records relating to trade, military affairs, treaties, removal to Oklahoma, land claims, trust funds, allotments, military service and pensions, and other dealings with the Choctaw Indians, which reach back to the early days of the existence of the Republic.

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Where to start in your search for Creek or Muskoke ancestors

The records relating to the Creek Indians are actually records of a number of different Indian tribes who belonged to confederacy of which the Muskoke or Creek (as they were called by the Europeans) were the principal power. The confederacy included various Muscogee people such as the Okfuskee, Otciapofa, Abikha, Okchai, Hilibi, Fus-hatchee, Tulsa, Coosa, as well as the Alabama, Natchez, Koasati and possibly some Shawnee who settled among them.

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Oh Redman

Oh Redman To My Beloved People and All Native Americans Oh Redman tall and proud, watch him take his stand. To protect his humble people, and their mighty sacred land.

In a time long ago

In a time long ago I dreamed a dream of long ago, when you and I were young, and meant to be. When with our tribe we wandered, far and wide and spoke the tongue, of the cherokee.

Porcupine Pot Roast

What does porcupine taste like? Generally, the flavor of porcupine meat will be influenced somewhat by whatever it’s been eating, but generally, Porcupine Pot Roast tastes similar to a pork roast.

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Tribal Training/Tribal Higher Education Scholarships for Alaskan Natives

The Tribal Training Grant program helps eligible Alaska Natives, American Indians and Native Hawaiians residing within the Cook Inlet Region obtain short-term certification or vocational training for job enhancement and/or employability. Funding is need-based and available on a first-come, first-completed … Continue reading

History timeline of the Alabama-Coushatta tribe of Texas

This article is a  timeline of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe, 1795 to 2002. Continue reading

Enrollment requirements of the Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians

There are only three requirements for enrollment in the Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians of the Fort Independence Reservation. Section 1: The membership of the Fort Independence Community shall consist of:

Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada tribal enrollment requirements

Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada tribal enrollment requirements… To be eligible for enrollment in the Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada, you must submit in writing proof of the following requirements as outlined in the Ely Shoshone Tribe Constitution adopted on April 21, 1990 and amended in 1999.

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Blackfeet tribal enrollment requirements

Enrollment in the Blackfeet Tribe is governed by Ordinance 14. (This link is a PDF file. You will need the Adobe Acrobat Reader to print and view this file. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader, you can … Continue reading

BLM announces first sale of wild horses to tribes

BISMARCK, N.D. – The federal Bureau of Land Management says it is selling
wild horses to American Indian tribes for the first time.

The BLM has sold 141 horses to the Rosebud Sioux in South Dakota and 120
horses to the Three Affiliated Tribes in North Dakota. More sales are planned in
the next several weeks, bringing the total to more than 500 horses.

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Ten dead in school shooting on Red Lake reservation

RED LAKE, Minn. – A Red Lake High School student went on a shooting rampage Monday afternoon, killing his grandfather and a woman at their home and then strapping on his grandfather’s police weapons and driving to the high school, … Continue reading

South Dakota men planning Native American Holocaust Monument

South Dakota men planning Native American Holocaust Monument…keywords: native american monument american history native american memorials monument project Three South Dakota men are trying to leave a permanent memorial for their people. Bryan Williams and his father Laurs, both of … Continue reading

The best place to vacation this year

The best place to vacation this year…KEYWORDS: indin humor indian joke native american joke ethnic joke hell joke clean joke funny joke racial joke A Dine’ guy is sitting in a bus stop with two old Anglo men.

John Wayne toilet paper

John Wayne toilet paper…KEYWORDS: indin humor indian joke indin joke native american joke toilet paper joke John Wayne joke funny joke A Cheyenne man goes into a grocery store, and asks for a package of toilet paper.

Lakota hunting trip

Lakota hunting trip…KEYWORDS: indian joke indin humor indin joke clean joke hunting joke dude joke native american joke lakota joke Two Lakota guys and a dude from New York are on a hunting trip.

How Indians measure time

How Indians measure time…KEYWORDS: indian joke native american joke indin humor indin joke indin time clean joke ethnic joke Anglos have BC and AD to measure time. Native People only have the four BC’s…

The Bronze Rat

The Bronze Rat…KEYWORDS: indian joke native american joke white man joke funny joke clean joke A Cheyenne guy went to Chinatown in San Francisco. While there he found a bronze rat at a thrift store. “How much do you want … Continue reading

How to tell if it’s going to be a cold winter

How to tell if it’s going to be a cold winter..KEYWORDS: indian joke indian humor indian humour blackfeet joke weather joke The Blackfeet asked their Chief in autumn, if the winter was going to be cold or not. Not really … Continue reading