Symbolism of Black Elk’s Vision

At the age of nine, Nicholas Black Elk, a holy man of the Oglala Sioux, had a great vision. This vision was the primary subject of his interview with writer John Neihardt and Neihardt’s subsequent 1932 novel, Black Elk Speaks. As the title suggests, Neihardt’s novel is the medium through which Black Elk shares his life narrative. Through the novel, in addition to the recounting of his great vision and other significant events in his personal history, Black Elk voices significant events and figures in Sioux history. 

Ohiyesa speaks of Sioux tribal traditions

Ohiyesa (Charles Alexander Eastman

Ohiyesa speaks of Sioux tribal traditions… KEYWORDS: Ohiyesa tribal traditions sioux culture sioux spirituality sioux beliefs on death sioux religious teachings sioux medicine sioux animal spirits sioux marriage customs sioux women souix names sioux property division sioux warfare traditions sioux … Continue reading

Native American Jewelry Art

Totems to Turquoise: Native North American Jewelry Arts of the Northwest and Southwest.. KEYWORDS: native american jewelry art of the northwest art of the southwest navajo jewelry hopi jewelry zuni jewelry pueblo jewelry haida jewelry tlingit jewelry salish jewelry American … Continue reading

Beading Loom Kit

Beading Loom Kit.. Shop for native american themed crafts. Make woven bead strips with this beading loom kit bead loom for making bead strips. This catalog page contains a beading loom kit.

Native American symbolism, culture and ceremony

There are many symbols, practices and customs, some of which are well-known to many people and some which are known only to a few. The following is a list with brief explanations about each. To achieve full understanding of some … Continue reading

Ojibwe eagle symbolism

The graceful bird of the skies, the eagle, is the prayer carrier and messenger of the Anishinabe people. As the eagle soars across the skies, one knows he is carrying the prayers to the Creator.The eagle has great significance for the Anishinabe and all native american people when it comes to healing ceremonies and ceremonies honouring and respecting other people. Although people of different cultures may have different beliefs, respecting others’ beliefs is part of the growing process in the Anishinabe way of life.

Anishinabe prayer carrier

Anishinabe prayer carrier.. KEYWORDS: anishinabe prayer carrier ojibwe ojibwa ojibway chippewa anishinabeg anishinaabe eagle power totem animals spiritural power of birds animals culture tradition religious beliefs The graceful bird of the skies, the eagle, is the prayer carrier and messenger … Continue reading

The Ojibwe clan system

People of all nations in the world essentially have the same basic needs: food, protection, education, medicine and leadership. Traditionally, the Ojibway Clan System was created to provide leadership and to care for these needs.

There were seven original clans and each clan was known by its animal emblem, or totem. The animal totem symbolized the strength and duties of the clan. The seven original clans were each given a function to serve for their people.

Blackfoot Confederacy

The Blackfoot Confederacy consists of four different tribes, the Pikuni/Peigan, North Peigan Pikuni, Blood/Kainai, and Blackfoot/Siksika.

General cultural beliefs of Algonquian speaking tribes

General cultural beliefs of Algonquain speaking tribes… KEYWORDS: algonquin culture algonquin tribes algonquing geographical area algonkin algonquin indians The Algonquin Indians (also spelled Algonkian) are the most populous and widespread North American Native groups, with tribes originally numbering in the … Continue reading

Native American Gathering Educational Program On Nov. 5

Native American Gathering Educational Program Is Nov. 5… KEYWORDS: Chattanooga Indigenous Resource Center Native American Gathering at the River cherokee culture Muscogee culture Cherokee cultures Nov. 5 Tennessee Riverpark’s West Pavilion Muscogee (Creek) Nation Seminole Nation of Oklahoma Cherokee Nation … Continue reading

We destroyed our own religion first

We destroyed our own religion first… KEYWORDS: native american religion and spirituality editorial sun dance sweat lodge ancient medicine culture indigenous cultures native american religion pagan religion shamanistic Nerkabah mysticism AUTHOR: Corey Wicks In the brilliant 1988 film Powwow Highway, … Continue reading

Burial customs practiced by Creek Freedmen

The Creek sho take on when somebody die! Long in de night you wake up and hear a gun go off, way yonder somewhar. Den it go again and again, jest as fast as they can ram de load in. Dat mean somebody die. When somebody die, de men go out in de yard and let people know dat way. Den dey jest go back in de house and let de fire go out and don’t even tech de dead person till somebody get dar who has a right to touch de dead.

Black Seminole surnames recorded on the Dawes roll

These lists represent the surnames of freedmen from the Seminole tribe who were adopted through the Dawes Commission, between 1898 and 1916.

Black Creeks adopted through the Dawes Commission between 1898 and 1916

Note that many of these names appear in other Indian nation lists, and their appearance here does not provide proof of Black Indian Ancestry.

In addition to these items, it is recommended that the researcher obtain as much oral history as possible on the family, and then locate the Dawes records on the family, including the names of ancestors on the Enrollment Cards and other pertinent records.

Black Choctaws adopted through the Dawes Commission

Note that many of these names appear in other Indian nation lists, and their appearance here does not provide proof of Black Indian Ancestry.

Black Chickasaws adopted through the Dawes Commission between 1898 and 1916

Note that many of these names appear in other Indian nation lists, and their appearance here iss not absolute provide proof of Black Indian Ancestry. In addition to these items, it is recommended that the researcher obtain as much oral history as possible on the family, and then locate the Dawes records on the family, including the names of ancestors on the Enrollment Cards and other pertinent records.

Black Cherokee Surnames recorded on the Dawes roll

This list of surnames represent the names of the Black freedmen who were adopted through the Dawes Commission, between 1898 and 1916. Note that many of these names appear in other Indian nation lists, and their inclusion here does not provide absolute proof of Black Indian Ancestry. 

In addition to these items, it is recommended that the researcher obtain as much oral history as possible on the family, and then locate the Dawes records on the family, including the names of ancestors on the Enrollment Cards and other pertinent records.

The Freedmen: James Coody Johnson

The Freedmen: James Coody Johnson … KEYWORDS:James Coody Johnson freedmen black indians black creek freedmen black indian leader freemen who lived with Indians creek indian history Oklahoma Freedmen African-Native people green peach war Seminole Freedmen A significant number of Afro-Americans … Continue reading

The Freedmen:John Myers, Creek Lighthorseman

A significant number of Afro-Americans were sold, escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership.  John … Continue reading

The Freedmen:Sugar T. George a.k.a. George Sugar

A significant number of Afro-Americans were sold, escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. They … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Silas Jefferson

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. The Freedman, Silas … Continue reading

The Freedmen: John Horse, adviser to Osceola

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. John Horse was an advisor to Osceola in Florida in the days of the Seminole wars.

The Freedmen: John Horse, adviser to Osceola

The Freedmen: John Horse, adviser to Osceola … KEYWORDS: John Horse freedmen black indians black Seminole wars black indian leader freemen who lived with Indians black adviser to Osceola Florida indian history Oklahoma Freedmen African-Native people A significant number of … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Harry Island was an official U.S. Interpreter for the Muskogee Creek

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. Harry Island served as one of the official U.S. Interpreters with the Muskogee Creek Nation. He was present during many official hearings during the 1860s and 70s in the years following the Civil War.

The Freedmen: Caesar Bruner was born in Indian Territory as a free man

The Freedmen: Caesar Bruner was born in Indian Territory as a free man … KEYWORDS: Caesar Bruner freedmen black indians black seminoles black indian leader freemen who lived with Indians Seminole leaders seminole indian history seminole nation Bruner band A … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Caesar Bruner was born in Indian Territory as a free man

The Freedmen: Caesar Bruner was born in Indian Territory as a free man … KEYWORDS: Caesar Bruner freedmen black indians black seminoles black indian leader freemen who lived with Indians Seminole leaders seminole indian history seminole nation Bruner band A … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Dosar Barkus was a leader of the Black Seminole Indians

The Freedmen: Dosar Barkus was a leader in a Black Seminole community … KEYWORDS: Dosar Barkus freedmen black indians black seminoles black indian leader slaves who lived with Indians Seminole leaders seminole indian history seminole nation Sasakwa, Indian Territory A … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Dosar Barkus was a leader in a Black Seminole community

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. Dosar Barkus is one such individual who became a leader in a Black Seminole community.

The Freedmen: Cow Tom of the Creek Nation

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. Cow Tom is one such individual. Creek Nation history cannot be written without the name of Cow Tom.

The Freedmen: Abraham the African Seminole Leader

The Freedmen: Abraham the African Seminole Leader… KEYWORDS: freedmen black indians seminole leader abraham black indian leaders slaves who lived with Indians A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they … Continue reading

The Freedmen: Abraham the African Seminole Leader

A significant number of Afro-Americans escaped or fled from slavery and eventually settled in the West, where they were adopted by Indian tribes and accepted into the tribal structure as equals. Many even assumed roles of leadership. Abraham, the African Seminole is one such leader.

The Wichita four cycles prophecy

The Atakapans or Wichitas believe that they came out of the sea, that a prophet or man inspired by God laid down the rules of conduct to their first ancestors which consisted of not doing evil.

They believe in an author of all things: that those who do well will go above, and that those who do evil descend under the earth into the shadows.

They speak of a deluge which swallowed up men, animals , and the land, and it was only those who resided along a high land or mountain who escaped this calamity.

The legend is divided into four parts…

Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater Reservation

The Duckwater Shoshone Tribe is a Western Shoshoni tribe. The Shoshoni controlled one of the most important east-west corridors in the West.

Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada

The Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada is located on the Southwest & Southeast sides of the City of Ely, Nevada in three seperate locations in White Pine County, Nevada. They are a band of the Western Shoshone indians.

Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation

Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation Paiute Spring Roundup

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation are Northern Paiutes. Much of the economy on the Pyramid Lake Reservation is centered around fishing and recreational activities at Pyramid Lake. In addition to permit fees for fishing, day use and overnight camping, the Tribe also receives lease revenue, and tax revenue. Several Tribal members belong to the Pyramid Lake Cattleman’s Cooperative Association and the Association utilizes the reservation desert open range to operate and manage the individual cattle herds.

Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation

Descendents of the Western Shoshone and the Northern Paiute occupy the Duck Valley Indian Reservation of Idaho and Nevada.  Various bands of the two closely related tribes have jointly utilized the area from time immemorial.

In 1884, an effort to move the Western Shoshone to the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho (and open up Duck Valley lands for non-Indian homesteads) was successfully resisted by the headmen of the bands. The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of Duck Valley continue to exist within the original territories of their ancestors.

Petitioners List for Federal Recognition by State

This is a list of American Indian tribes waiting for federal recognition by the US Government, organized by state. The list is current as of March 3, 1998 and was prepared by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, “Branch of Acknowledgment & Research.”

Featured Artist of the Week: Carol Grigg

artist Carol Grigg

This week’s featured Artist of the Week is the renown Carol Grigg, who is famous for her stylized horses and native american art.

Carol Grigg grew up and still lives in Oregon. Grigg draws inspiration from her Cherokee Indian heritage, nature, and primitive art. She works in multiple media: watercolor, oil, inks, lithography, collage, clay, music, and poetry.

Cleared up Desperation…

One’s thoughts – actions – goals

nothingness filled up with sense

constructed stand points.

Clever words – wisdom of self

static dissolving in space.

Can you interpret these signs?

We are looking for an answer to a number of fore-telling dreams my husband has been having since we met 2 yrs ago. They are of an old Indian Woman who speaks to him thru her thoughts.

Time is Now to launch New Tribal Economies

AUTHOR: Terrance H. Booth, Sr., Director Native Nations Sustainable Alliance A. David Lester, Executive Director, Council on Energy Resources Tribes (CERT) writes, “Indian business is not about money, it is about expressing our deeply held Indian Values in economic terms, … Continue reading