Alphabetical list of US Indian Reservations
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Alphabetical list of US Indian Reservations





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 Alphabetical list of US Indian Reservations



Indian reservations are areas with boundaries established by treaty, statute, and/or executive or court order, and recognized by the Federal Government as territory in which American Indian tribes have jurisdiction. There were 304 reservations for american indians in the continental US as of 1996. As of 2000, there were (need number). This is an alphabetical list of those US. Reservations. This is a work in progress that is currently incomplete. Eventually it will list every indian reservation in the United States, cross-referenced to the tribe or tribes that live on it.

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L
M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - Y - Z
A

  1. Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico
    The Acoma Indian Reservation is located in parts of Cibola, Socorro, and Catron counties, New Mexico, USA, and covers 1,541.033 km² (594.996 sq mi). The number of tribal members is about 6000. The reservation borders the Laguna Indian Reservation to the east and is near El Malpais National Monument due west. A total of 2,802 people were living on the reservation's lands, as reported in the 2000 census. The Acoma Pueblo is the heart of the reservation and is regarded as the oldest continuously inhabited place in the United States. Also has Off-Reservation Trust Lands.


  2. Absentee Shawnee


  3. Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California
    The Cahuilla are a group of Native Americans that have inhabited California for more than 2000 years. The Cahuilla have been historically divided into "Mountain," "Desert," and "Pass" groups by anthropologists. Today there are nine Southern California reservations that are acknowledged homes to bands of Cahuilla people located in Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties: Agua Caliente, Augustine (the smallest federally recognized Native American tribe of 6 persons in the 2000's), Cabazon, Cahuilla, Los Coyotes, Morongo, Ramona, Santa Rosa, and Torres Martinez.


  4. Ak-Chin Indian Reservation --(see Maricopa Indian Reservation, Arizona)
    The Ak-Chin Indian Community is a Native American community located in the Santa Cruz Valley in Arizona. The community is mainly comprised of Pima and Tohono O'odham, as well as some Yoeme members. Ak-Chin is an O'odham word that means "place where the wash loses itself in the sand or ground."


  5. Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation, Texas
    The two tribes are closely related. The Alibamu and Koasati tribes were part of the Creek Confederacy. In 1820, there were three main Alabama towns and three large Coushatta towns in east Texas, in the region known as the Big Thicket. In 1854, the Alabamas were given 1280 acres in Polk County. The following year, 640 acres, also in Polk County, were given to the Coushattas. The Coushatta claim was disputed by white settlers in 1859. When the Coushatta lost the land claim, the Alabama asked them to come live on their land claim. The federal government approved a large grant to purchase land near the reservation in 1928. It was granted to the "Alabama and Coushatta tribes." Since that time, the reservation has officially been known as “Alabama-Coushatta,” and the combined tribe as the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas, whose sovereignty was formally recognized by the federal government in 1987.


  6. Alabama-Quassarte Creeks


  7. Allegany Indian Reservation, New York
    This reservation has a total area of 113.1 km² (43.7 mi²). 94.2 km² (36.4 mi²) of it is land and 18.8 km² (7.3 mi²) of it (16.65%) is water. The reservation is primarily occupied by members of the Seneca Nation of the Iroquois, but a smaller number of Cayuga, another Iroquois tribe, also reside there.


  8. Alturas Rancheria


  9. Annette Island Reserve, Alaska
    Annette Island is an island in Gravina Islands of the Alexander Archipelago of the Pacific Ocean on the southeastern coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is at 55°08'N, 131°27'W. It is about 18 km (12 miles) long and about 18 km (12 miles) wide. The land area is 332.573 km² (128.407 sq mi). Metlakatla is a native Community founded by the Anglican missionary William Duncan. The island is composed mainly of Tsimshian Natives and is a cultural crossroads for Tlingit and Haida Natives as well. The largest settlement on the island is Metlakatla. The entire island is an Indian reservation, the only one in Alaska.


  10. Apache


  11. Augustine Indian Reservation, California
    The Cahuilla are a group of Native Americans that have inhabited California for more than 2000 years. The Augustine Band of Cahuilla is the smallest indian tribe in the US, with only six members. Today there are nine Southern California reservations that are acknowledged homes to bands of Cahuilla people located in Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties: Agua Caliente, Augustine (the smallest federally recognized Native American tribe of 6 persons in the 2000's), Cabazon, Cahuilla, Los Coyotes, Morongo, Ramona, Santa Rosa, and Torres Martinez.


  12. Back to Top

    B
  13. Bad River Indian Reservation, Wisconsin
    The Bad River Band of Chippewa Indians is located on this reservation on the south shore of Lake Superior. The Bad River reservation, which has a land area of 497.477 km² (192.077 sq mi), is in northern Wisconsin straddling Ashland and Iron counties. The band has approximately 6,000 members, of whom 1,411 lived on the reservation during the 2000 census. Most people live in one of four towns: Odanah, Diaperville (Old Odanah), Birch Hill, or Frank's Field. Odanah, the administrative and cultural center, is located five miles east of the town of Ashland on U.S. Highway 2. Over 90% of the reservation is wilderness.


  14. Barona Indian Reservation, (also known as Barona Ranch), California
    The Kumeyaay, also known as the Diegueño and sometimes confused with the Luiseño, are a Native American people of the extreme southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. They live in the states of California, Baja California, and Sonora. In Spanish, the name is commonly spelled kumiai.

    There are 13 Kumeyaay reservations in southern San Diego County (Barona, Campo, Capitan Grande, Cuyapaipe, Inaja, Jamul, La Posta, Manzanita, Mesa Grande, San Pasqual, Santa Ysabel, Sycuan, and Viejas), and four kumiai settlements in Baja California (La Huerta, Nejí, San Antonio Nicuarr, and San José de la Zorra). The group living on a particular reservation is referred to as a "band," such as the "Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians."

    The meaning of the term Kumeyaay is unknown, but Ipi or Tipi means person, although in contemporary times it is taken to mean Indian. Some Kumeyaay in the southern areas also refer to themselves as MuttTipi, which means "people of the earth."


  15. Battle Mountain Indian Reservation, (also known as Battle Mountain Colony), Nevada
    The Battle Mountain Reservation is located on the west side of the city limits of the town of Battle Mountain, Nevada. It consists of two separate parcels of land totaling 683.3 acres. The original 677.05-acre reservation was established by Executive Order on June 18, 1917, for Shoshones living near Winnemucca and Battle Mountain. By an Act of Congress on August 21, 1967, an additional 6.25 acres were added to colony lands.

    The Battle Mountain Colony is one of four spearate colonies that comprise the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians. The Te-Moak Tribal Council has total jurisdiction over all tribal lands, but the colonies retain sovereignty over all the other affairs. The Battle Mountain colony has its own tribal council.

    There are very few employment opportunities on this reservation. The main economic source for the reservation is the smokeshop/convenience store. It employs about six people. A newley formed tribal business, the Battle Mountain Filter Service Company, cleans filters for the nearby mines. It has three full-time employees. The total reservation population is 165. Total tribal enrollment is 516 as of 2000.


  16. Bay Mills Indian Reservation, Michigan
    The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) is an Indian reservation forming the land base of the Sault Ste. Marie band of Chippewas. The largest section of the reservation is located in Chippewa County, Michigan approximately 15 miles (25 km) west-southwest of Sault Ste. Marie, in Bay Mills Township and Superior Township. A smaller section lies southeast of Sault Ste. Marie in western Sugar Island Township.

    With the passage of the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) of 1934, the Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) was one of the four original reservations established in Michigan. In 1937, land was purchased for Bay Mills and the BMIC was organized with the adoption of their Constitution and Charter on November 27, 1937 in accordance with the IRA. These lands, along with the original Bay Mills Mission and a small area on Sugar Island, comprise the majority of the current reservation land holdings in Chippewa County.

    The area within the reservation boundaries is in U.S. trust status and is divided into two separate areas. As of the 2000 census the majority of the land base, 3.761 square miles (9.740 km²), lies northwest of Brimley, Michigan, in the eastern parts of Bay Mills Township and Superior Township, while the remainder, 1.032 square miles (2.674 km² or 660.67 acres), lies on Sugar Island in the St. Marys River. Its total land area at that time was 4.793 square miles (12.413 km²) on which a population of 812 persons resided. The Tribe has also obtained additional land in the last few years, increasing the land base to approximately 3,494 acres (5.46 sq mi; 14.14 km²), of which 3,109 acres (4.86 sq mi; 12.58 km²) are in trust.


  17. Benton Paiute Indian Reservation, California
    The Mono are a Native American people who traditionally lived in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains (generally south of Bridgeport, California) and adjacent areas of the Great Basin. They are divided into the Eastern Mono and the Western Mono, roughly based on the Sierra crest. The Eastern Mono are also known as the Owens Valley Paiute, and some anthropologists group them with the Northern Paiute.


  18. Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians, California
    The Tyme Maidu Tribe, a community of the Maidu nation, lives on the Berry Creek Rancheria.They are federally recognized as the Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians. The Maidu are a group of Native Americans who lived in Northern California. They lived in the central Sierra Nevada, in the drainage area of the Feather and American Rivers. There are three subcategories of Maidu: The Nisenan or Southern Maidu occupied the whole of the American, Bear and Yuba River Yuba River drainages. The Northeastern or Mountain Maidu, also know as Yamonee Maidu, lived on the upper North and Middle forks of the Feather River. The Konkow or Northwestern Maidu lived below the high Sierra, in the South, Middle, North and West branches of the Feather River, on the Upper Butte and Chico Creeks, and in the Sacramento Valley along the lower course of those streams.

    The name Maidu means "person." The Maidu were exemplary basket makers, weaving highly detailed and useful baskets in sizes ranging from thimble-sized to huge ones ten or more feet in diameter. The stitches on some of these baskets are so fine that you need a magnifying glass to see them. In addition to closely woven, watertight baskets for cooking, they made large storage baskets, bowls, shallow trays, traps, cradles, hats and seed beaters. To make these baskets they used dozens of different kinds of wild plant stems, barks, roots and leaves. Some of the more common were fern roots, red bark of the redbud, white willow twigs and tule roots, hazel twigs, yucca leaves, brown marsh grass roots and sedge roots. By combining these different kinds of plants, they were able to make geometric designs on their baskets in red, black, white, brown or tan.


  19. Big Bend Rancheria, California
    Approximately 110 members of the Pit River Tribe live on the 40 acres of the Big Bend Rancheria.


  20. Big Cypress Indian Reservation, Florida
    The Big Cypress Indian Reservation is located in southeastern Hendry County and northwestern Broward County in southern Florida in the United States. The reservation lies south of Lake Okeechobee and just north of Alligator Alley. The reservation is governed by the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and is the largest of the five Seminole reservations in the state. The land area is 212.306 km² (81.972 sq mi), and a resident population of 142 persons was reported in the 2000 census.

    The tribe owns two tourist attractions: Swamp Safari, and The Big Cypress Entertainment Complex. The reservation is also called Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation or Big Cypress Reservation.


  21. Big Lagoon Rancheria, California
    The Big Lagoon Rancheria is a federally recognized Indian Tribe established in 1918. Big Lagoon abuts the tribal reservation. The 20-acre Rancheria includes eight homes. Eighteen families belong to this tribe. The tribe of Big Lagoon Rancheria is made up of remnants of the Yurok and Tolowa Indians.


  22. Big Pine Indian Reservation, California
    The Big Pine Band of Owens Valley Paiute Shoshone Indians live on the Big Pine Reservation and are federally recognized. The Shoshone people were originally Eastern Shoshone.


  23. The Paiute (PY-yoot) tribe is actually many different bands distributed across a large part of the western United States. Paiute means "true Ute" or "water Ute." The Paiutes call themselves Numu, meaning "People." The vast desert area used by the Paiutes extends from central Oregon southward through Las Vegas Valley to land along the Colorado River in Arizona and Southern California and eastward to southwestern Idaho.

    The numerous Paiutes bands are often recognized in three main groups: (1) the Northern Paiutes of northwestern Nevada, northeastern California, southeastern Oregon, and southwestern Idaho, (2) the Owens Valley Paiutes, who traditionally inhabited the Owens River watershed of southeastern California, and, (3) the Southern Paiutes of southeastern California, southern Nevada, northwestern Arizona, and western Utah. Paiute peoples were also historically called Snakes and Bannocks by whites.

    The Paiute population is broadly scattered, living in numerous small communities and a few large reservations. The Northern Paiutes live in at least 14 communities including: Pyramid Lake, Walker River, Fort McDermott, Fallon, Reno-Sparks area, Yerington, Lovelock, Summit Lake, and Winnemucca in Nevada; Burns and Warm Springs in Oregon; and, Bridgeport, Cedarville, and Fort Bidwell in California. Tribal memberships ranged from less than 20 individuals with the Winnemucca in 1992 to almost 2,000 with the Pyramid Lake tribe.

    The Owens Valley Paiute communities include Bishop, Big Pine, Lone Pine, Fort Independence, and Benton in eastern California. Their memberships in 1991 ranged from 84 at Benton to 1,350 at Bishop. Ten Southern Paiute communities include the Shivwits, Indian Peaks, Cedar, Koosharem, Kanosh, Kaibab, Moapa, Las Vegas, and San Juan. Their memberships are also small and ranged from 71 at Las Vegas to almost 300 at Moapa in 1992.

  24. Big Sandy Rancheria (Band of Western Mono Indians),California
    In 1909, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) purchased 280 acres of land to be held in trust for the benefit of the San Joaquin or Big Sandy Band of Western Mono Indians. This land became known as the Big Sandy Rancheria of Auberry.

    In 1958, congress enacted the California act authorizing the termination of the trust status of the lands and the Indian status of the people of the 41 California Rancherias, including Big Sandy.

    As a result of a 1983 United States District Court Action, the BSR was officially restored as Indian Country and the people of the tribe restored as federally recognized Indians. Official website


  25. Big Valley Rancheria (of Pomo & Pit River Indians), California
    Big Valley Rancheria is home to the Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians. Big Valley Tribal members are descendants of the Xa-Ben-Na-Po Band of Pomo Indians that historically have inhabited the Clear Lake area for over 11,800 years. The Big Valley Rancheria was initially established as a Catholic Mission in 1877.

    This tribe was originally given federal recognition in 1934, then in 1963 it was illegally terminated under the California Rancheria Act of 1959. The tribe was subsequently re-established by court order as a federally recognized tribal entity in 1983 under Tillie-Hardwick. During that 20-year period approximately half of the original Rancheria land had been re-sold to non-Indians. Today, this reservation includes 153 acres.Official Website


  26. Bishop Indian Reservation


  27. BLACKFEET


  28. BRIDGEPORT


  29. BRIGHTON


  30. BURNS PAIUTE COLONY


24. CABEZON

25. CADDO

26. CAHUILLA

27. CAMPO

28. CAMP VERDE

29. CANONCITO

30. CAPITAN GRANDE

31. CARSON

32. CATAWBA

33. CATTARAUGUS

34. CAYUGA

35. CEDARVILLE

36. CHEHALIS

37. CHEMEHUEVI

38. CHEROKEE

39. CHEYENNE-ARAPAHOE

40. CHEYENNE RIVER

41. CHICKASAW

42. CHITIMACHA

43. CHOCTAW

44. CITIZEN BAND OF POTAWATOMI

45. COCHITI

46. COEUR D'ALENE

47. COLD SPRINGS

48. COLORADO RIVER

49. COLVILLE

50. COMANCHE

51. COOS, LOWER UMPQUA & SIUSLAW

52. COQUILLE

53. CORTINA

54. COUSHATTA

55. COW CREEK

56. CREEK

57. CROW

58. CROW CREEK

59. CUYAPAIPE

60. DEER CREEK

61. DELAWARE

62. DEVILS LAKE

63. DRESSLERVILLE COLONY

64. DRY CREEK

65. DUCKWATER

66. DUCK VALLEY

67. EASTERN SHAWNEE

68. EAST COCOPAH

69. ELY COLONY

70. ENTERPRISE

71. FALLON

72. FLANDREAU INDIAN SCHOOL

73. FLATHEAD

74. FOND DU LAC

75. FORT APACHE

76. FORT BELKNAP

77. FORT BERTHOLD

78. FORT BIDWELL

79. FORT HALL

80. FORT INDEPENDENCE

81. FORT MCDERMITT

82. FORT MCDOWELL

83. FORT MOHAVE

84. FORT PECK

85. FORT YUMA

86. FT. SILL APACHE

87. GILA BEND

88. GILA RIVER

89. GOSHUTE

90. GRANDE RONDE

91. GRAND PORTAGE

92. GRAND TRAVERSE

93. GREATER LEECH LAKE

94. GRINDSTONE

95. HANNAHVILLE

96. HAVASUPAI

97. HOH

98. HOLLYWOOD

99. HOOPA VALLEY

100. HOPI

101. HOULTON MALISEETS

 

102. HUALAPAI

103. INAJA

104. IOWA

105. ISABELLA

106. ISLETA

107. JACKSON

108. JEMEZ

109. JICARILLA

110. KAIBAB

111. KALISPEL

112. KAW

113. KIALEGEE CREEK

114. KICKAPOO

115. KIOWA

116. KLAMATH

117. KOOTENAI

118. L'ANSE

119. LAC COURTE OREILLES

120. LAC DU FLAMBEAU

121. LAC VIEUX DESERT

122. LAGUNA

123. LAS VEGAS

124. LAYTONVILLE

125. LA JOLLA

126. LA POSTA

127. LIKELY

128. LONE PINE

129. LOOKOUT

130. LOS COYOTES

131. LOVELOCK COLONY

132. LOWER BRULE

133. LOWER ELWAH

134. LOWER SIOUX

135. LUMMI

136. MAKAH

137. MANCHESTER

138. MANZANITA

139. MARICOPA

140. MASHANTUCKET PEQUOT

141. MATTAPONI +

142. MENOMINEE

143. MESCALERO

144. MIAMI

145. MICCOSUKEE

146. MIDDLETOWN

147. MILLE LACS

148. MISSION

149. MOAPA

150. MODOC

151. MOLE LAKE

152. MONTGOMERY CREEK

153. MORONGO

154. MUCKLESHOOT

155. NAMBE

156. NARRAGANSETT

157. NAVAJO

158. NETT LAKE

159. NEZ PERCE

160. NIPMOC-HASSANAMISCO +

161. NISQUALLY

162. NOOKSACK

163. NORTHERN CHEYENNE

164. NORTHWESTERN SHOSHONE

165. OIL SPRINGS

166. OMAHA

167. ONEIDA

168. ONONDAGA

169. ONTONAGON

170. OSAGE

171. OTOE-MISSOURI

172. OTTAWA

173. OUT

174. OZETTE

175. PAIUTE

176. PALA

177. PAMUNKEY +

178. PASCUA YAQUI

179. PASSAMAQUODDY

180. PAUCATAUK PEQUOT +

181. PAUGUSETT +

182. PAWNEE

183. PECHANGA

184. PENOBSCOT

185. PEORIA

186. PICURIS

187. PINE RIDGE

188. POARCH CREEK

189. POJOAQUE

190. PONCA

191. POOSEPATUCK +

192. PORT GAMBLE

193. PORT MADISON

194. POTAWATOMI

195. PRAIRIE ISLE

196. PUERTOCITO

197. PUYALLUP

198. PYRAMID LAKE

199. QUAPAW

200. QUILLAYUTE

201. QUINAULT

202. RAMAH

203. RAMONA

204. RED CLIFF

205. RED LAKE

206. RENO-SPARKS

207. RINCON

208. ROARING CREEK

209. ROCKY BOYS

210. ROSEBUD

211. ROUND VALLEY

212. RUMSEY

213. SAC AND FOX

214. SALT RIVER

215. SANDIA

216. SANDY LAKE

217. SANTA ANA

218. SANTA CLARA

219. SANTA DOMINGO

220. SANTA ROSA

221. SANTA ROSA (NORTH)

222. SANTA YNEZ

223. SANTA YSABEL

224. SANTEE

225. SAN CARLOS

226. SAN FELIPE

227. SAN ILDEFONSO

228. SAN JUAN

229. SAN MANUAL

230. SAN PASQUAL

231. SAN XAVIER

232. SAUK SUIATTLE

233. SEMINOLE

234. SENECA-CAYUGA

235. SEQUAN

236. SHAGTICOKE +

237. SHAKOPEE

238. SHEEP RANCH

239. SHERWOOD VALLEY

240. SHINGLE SPRING

241. SHINNECOCK +

242. SHOALWATER

243. SHOSHONE

244. SILETZ

245. SISSETON

246. SKOKOMISH

247. SKULL VALLEY

248. SOBOBA

249. SOUTHERN UTE

250. SPOKANE

251. SQUAXON ISLAND

252. ST. CROIX

253. ST. REGIS

254. STANDING ROCK

255. STEWARTS POINT

256. STOCKBRIDGE MUNSEE

257. SUMMIT LAKE

258. SUSANVILLE

259. SWINOMISH

260. TAOS

261. TE-MOAK

262. TESUQUE

263. TEXAS KICKAPOO

264. TOHONO O'ODHAM

265. TONAWANDA

266. TONIKAWA

267. TORRES MARTINEZ

268. TOULUMNE

269. TRINDAD

270. TULALIP

271. TULE RIVER

272. TUNICA-BILOXI

273. TURTLE MOUNTAINS

274. TUSCARORA

275. TWENTYNINE PALMS

276. UMATILLA

277. UNITAH AND OURAY

278. UNITED KEETOOWAH BAND OF CHEROKEE

279. UPPER SIOUX

280. UPPER SKAGIT

281. UTE MOUNTAIN

282. VERMILION LAKE

283. VIEJAS

284. WALKER RIVER

285. WARM SPRINGS

286. WASHOE

287. WEST COCOPAH

288. WHITE EARTH

289. WICHITA

290. WIND RIVER

291. WINNEBAGO

292. WINNEMUCCA

293. WOODFORD INDIAN COMMUNITY

294. WYANDOTTE

295. XL RANCH

296. YAKAMA

297. YANKTON

298. YAVAPAI

299. YERINGTON

300. YOMBA

301. YSLETA DEL SUR

302. YUROK

303. ZIA

304. ZUNI

In Alaska, they only have one indian reservation. Instead, most tribes are organized as villages. See Alaska Natives A-Z

For Indian reservations arranged by related tribes see US Reservations by Tribes

Hawiaan Indians - ?

In Canada indian reservations are called Reserves. See Canadian Reserves.



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